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Items 1 to 10 of about 12468
1. Yamaguchi A, Nakayama K, Tsuchida M: [Aspergillus osteomyelitis of the sternum after thoracoplasty]. Nihon Kyobu Geka Gakkai Zasshi; 1990 Mar;38(3):457-60
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  • [Title] [Aspergillus osteomyelitis of the sternum after thoracoplasty].
  • The case of a 69-year-old man with osteomyelitis of the sternum caused by Aspergillus is reported.
  • The patient had undergone a thoracoplasty eighteen months before for left empyema.
  • At operation, the lower fourth of the sternum with some bilateral costal cartilages was resected, and the resultant dead space was covered with a rectus abdominis muscle flap.
  • The diagnosis as Aspergillus osteomyelitis of the sternum was confirmed by culture of resected material.
  • The cause of sternal osteomyelitis was assumed to be direct spread from an infection of costal cartilages left at thoracoplasty.
  • He was discharged on the 31st postoperative day after complete wound healing.
  • [MeSH-major] Aspergillosis / etiology. Osteomyelitis / etiology. Postoperative Complications. Sternum. Thoracoplasty
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Humans. Male

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  • (PMID = 2348128.001).
  • [ISSN] 0369-4739
  • [Journal-full-title] [Zasshi] [Journal]. Nihon Kyōbu Geka Gakkai
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nihon Kyobu Geka Gakkai Zasshi
  • [Language] jpn
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
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2. Sano S, Okazaki K, Yamamoto Y: Biosynthesis and secretion of mucin-related products in Hs746T gastric cancer cells. J Gastroenterol; 1994 Oct;29(5):569-76
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  • [Title] Biosynthesis and secretion of mucin-related products in Hs746T gastric cancer cells.
  • We have previously studied the biosynthesis and secretion of mucin in the normal human stomach and reported that the tetramer of the 60-kDa subunit of mucin core protein was synthesized and highly glycosylated, and that only high molecular weight mucin was secreted.
  • In this study, we investigated the mucin-related products of a gastric cancer cell line (Hs746T).
  • Analysis of intracellular and extracellular products immunoprecipitated with an anti-apomucin monoclonal antibody revealed that a 110-kDa protein, the dimer of the 55-kDa subunit, was synthesized and secreted.
  • Tunicamycin treatment inhibited the secretion of the 110-kDa protein.
  • These findings suggest that N-glycosylation may be involved in the secretory mechanism of the mucin-related product.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / metabolism. Mucins / metabolism. Stomach Neoplasms / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Line. Glycosylation. Humans. Mannosyl-Glycoprotein Endo-beta-N-Acetylglucosaminidase / pharmacology. Tumor Cells, Cultured. Tunicamycin / pharmacology

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  • (PMID = 8000503.001).
  • [ISSN] 0944-1174
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastroenterology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Gastroenterol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mucins; 11089-65-9 / Tunicamycin; EC 3.2.1.96 / Mannosyl-Glycoprotein Endo-beta-N-Acetylglucosaminidase
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3. Yamamoto Y, Atoji Y, Suzuki Y: Morphology of the glomerular nerve endings in the dorsal nasal ligament of the dog. Arch Histol Cytol; 2000;63(5):467-72
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  • [Title] Morphology of the glomerular nerve endings in the dorsal nasal ligament of the dog.
  • The nasal atrium appears to be an important sensory site in the dog, yet no literature is available concerning its nerve supply.
  • The present paper demonstrates the occurrence of glomerular nerve endings in the canine nasal atrium, using immunohistochemistry for neurofilament protein (NFP) and for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP).
  • Glomerular nerve endings occurred on the perichondrium of the septal and the dorsal lateral nasal cartilages, and their terminal portions were attached with dense collagen fibril strands of the dorsal nasal ligament.
  • The glomerular endings were derived from a thick parent axon which branched repeatedly.
  • Complicated winding nerve fibers gave rise to numerous thin filamentous terminals.
  • Accumulations of GFAP immunoreactive glial cells were also observed.
  • Immunoelectron microscopy for NFP revealed several axon terminals in the glomerular endings which contained numerous neurofilaments and mitochondria and were incompletely covered by Schwann cell sheaths.
  • The glomerular endings in the dog nasal vestibule are suggested to perceive tensional changes in the nasal dorsal ligament caused by the opening of the nostrils and to be involved in the reflex regulating the activity of the nasal muscles.
  • [MeSH-major] Nasal Cavity / innervation. Nose / innervation
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Axons / metabolism. Collagen / biosynthesis. Dogs. Female. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein / biosynthesis. Immunohistochemistry. Male. Microscopy, Immunoelectron. Models, Biological. Neurofilament Proteins / biosynthesis. Neurons / metabolism. Schwann Cells / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 11201205.001).
  • [ISSN] 0914-9465
  • [Journal-full-title] Archives of histology and cytology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch. Histol. Cytol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein; 0 / Neurofilament Proteins; 9007-34-5 / Collagen
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4. Yamamoto Y, Imaeda K, Suzuki H: Endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and intercellular electrical coupling in guinea-pig mesenteric arterioles. J Physiol; 1999 Jan 15;514 ( Pt 2):505-13
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  • [Title] Endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and intercellular electrical coupling in guinea-pig mesenteric arterioles.
  • 1. Using the conventional whole-cell clamp method, the electrical responses of individual smooth muscle and endothelial cells to acetylcholine (ACh) were observed in multicellular preparations where the two types of cells remained in close apposition.
  • 2. In both types of cells, ACh induced similar hyperpolarizing responses which, when recorded in current clamp mode, had two phases (an initial fast and a second slower phase).
  • 3. After blocking gap junctions, including myoendothelial junctions, with 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid, ACh induced an outward current with two phases in voltage-clamped endothelial cells.
  • The outward current appeared around -90 mV and increased linearly with the membrane depolarization.
  • 4. In smooth muscle cells, ACh failed to induce a membrane current after gap junctions had been blocked with 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid.
  • The inhibition of ACh-induced response by 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid was observed using either sharp or patch electrodes.
  • 5. Nominally Ca2+-free solution reduced the initial phase and abolished the second phase of ACh-induced responses of endothelial cells.
  • Both phases were also reduced by charybdotoxin (CTX).
  • 6. Our results indicate that in guinea-pig mesenteric arterioles, ACh hyperpolarizes endothelial cells by activating Ca2+-activated K+ channels which are sensitive to CTX.
  • On the other hand, hyperpolarizing responses detected in smooth muscle cells seem to originate in endothelial cells and conduct to the muscle layer via myoendothelial gap junctions.
  • [MeSH-major] Arterioles / physiology. Endothelium, Vascular / physiology. Muscle, Smooth, Vascular / physiology. Splanchnic Circulation / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Acetylcholine / pharmacology. Animals. Charybdotoxin / pharmacology. Gap Junctions / drug effects. Gap Junctions / physiology. Glycyrrhetinic Acid / pharmacology. Guinea Pigs. Ileum / innervation. In Vitro Techniques. Male. Membrane Potentials / drug effects. Membrane Potentials / physiology. Muscle, Smooth / innervation. Patch-Clamp Techniques

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  • (PMID = 9852331.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3751
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Physiol. (Lond.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 115422-61-2 / Charybdotoxin; N9YNS0M02X / Acetylcholine; P540XA09DR / Glycyrrhetinic Acid
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2269064
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5. Yamamoto Y, Tomida M, Hozumi M: Macrophage activating factor is not identical with immune interferon or a factor inducing differentiation of mouse myeloid leukemic cells. Gan; 1982 Aug;73(4):557-64
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  • [Title] Macrophage activating factor is not identical with immune interferon or a factor inducing differentiation of mouse myeloid leukemic cells.
  • Conditioned media of mitogen- or antigen-stimulated spleen cells have been found to contain various lymphokines including macrophage activating factor (MAF), immune interferon (IFN-gamma) and a factor inducing differentiation of mouse myeloid leukemic M1 cells into macrophages and granulocytes (D-factor).
  • We examined the properties and mutual relations of these lymphokines.
  • Conditioned media of concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated spleen cells and of purified protein derivative (PPD)-stimulated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-immune spleen cells contained the activities of D-factor, MAF and IFN.
  • These lymphokines were similarly eluted on Sephadex G-100 in a peak corresponding to a molecular weight of 40,000 approximately 60,000.
  • However, a rapidly eluted fraction contained MAF but not activities of D-factor and IFN.
  • Treatment of conditioned medium of Con A-stimulated spleen cells at pH 2 abolished the activities of MAF and IFN but did not affect the activity of D-factor.
  • Moreover, addition of cytochalasin B suppressed the productions of MAF and IFN but not that of D-factor by Con A-stimulated spleen cells.
  • Antiserum against mouse IFN-gamma neutralized IFN activity but not MAF activity in the conditioned medium of Con A-stimulated spleen cells.
  • These results indicate that D-factor, MAF and IFN-gamma are all distinct substances.
  • [MeSH-major] Cell Differentiation / drug effects. Glycoproteins / isolation & purification. Growth Inhibitors. Interferon-gamma / isolation & purification. Interleukin-6. Leukemia, Myeloid / immunology. Lymphokines / isolation & purification. Macrophages / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Concanavalin A / pharmacology. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor. Macrophage-Activating Factors. Mice. Molecular Weight. Spleen / cytology. Spleen / immunology

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  • (PMID = 6818089.001).
  • [ISSN] 0016-450X
  • [Journal-full-title] Gan
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gan
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glycoproteins; 0 / Growth Inhibitors; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / Leukemia Inhibitory Factor; 0 / Lif protein, mouse; 0 / Lymphokines; 0 / Macrophage-Activating Factors; 11028-71-0 / Concanavalin A; 82115-62-6 / Interferon-gamma
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6. Yamamoto Y, Hotta K, Matsuda T: Effect of methionine-enkephalin on the spontaneous electrical and mechanical activity of the smooth muscle of the rat portal vein. Life Sci; 1984 Mar 5;34(10):993-9
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  • [Title] Effect of methionine-enkephalin on the spontaneous electrical and mechanical activity of the smooth muscle of the rat portal vein.
  • In the longitudinal smooth muscle of the isolated rat portal vein, methionine-enkephalin (Met-enkephalin) increased the spontaneous contraction with a concentration as low as 10(-8)M.
  • When the membrane activity was recorded using a microelectrode, Met-enkephalin enhanced the spike burst activity but without any effect on the resting membrane potential.
  • Naloxone, phentolamine, atropine and reserpine pre-treatment did not inhibit the excitatory effect of Met-enkephalin on the spontaneous contraction.
  • These results suggest that the excitatory effect of Met-enkephalin on the mechanisms involved in the automaticity may be a direct action on smooth muscle or relate to presynaptic action on a non-adrenergic non-cholinergic system.
  • [MeSH-major] Enkephalin, Methionine / pharmacology. Muscle, Smooth, Vascular / drug effects. Portal Vein / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Atropine / pharmacology. Electrophysiology / drug effects. Male. Membrane Potentials / drug effects. Muscle Contraction / drug effects. Naloxone / pharmacology. Phentolamine / pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Inbred Strains

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  • (PMID = 6700366.001).
  • [ISSN] 0024-3205
  • [Journal-full-title] Life sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Life Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 36B82AMQ7N / Naloxone; 58569-55-4 / Enkephalin, Methionine; 7C0697DR9I / Atropine; Z468598HBV / Phentolamine
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7. Tsutsui N, Yamamoto Y, Iwami K: Protein-nutritive assessment of sake lees obtained by brewing from liquefied rice. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo); 1998 Feb;44(1):177-86
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  • [Title] Protein-nutritive assessment of sake lees obtained by brewing from liquefied rice.
  • Sake lees obtained by brewing from liquefied rice were deprived of water and alcohol by lyophilization, and then examined for nutritional availability with the aid of proximate food analysis, amino acid analysis and animal experiment.
  • Freeze-dried sake lees powder was comprised of 44.6% protein, 37.4% carbohydrate, 2.5% fat, 6.7% fiber, 1.8% ash and 7.2% moisture (alcohol < 0.1%), of which the nutritive value (amino acid score) was estimated as 89.6 when compared with the amino acid requirements for preschool children (FAO/WHO/UNU, 1985).
  • Sake lees protein had been, however, appreciably improved in the limiting amino acid "lysine" relative to polished rice protein.
  • As a result of an animal experiment, the rats fed a 50% sake lees powder diet proved to be equal in growth to those fed a 20% casein (control) diet, although the former diet had to be supplemented with vitamins and minerals, which were in shortage as compared to the control diet.
  • On the other hand, the feeding of sake lees powder was effective in lowering the serum triacylglycerol concentration.
  • Accordingly, sake lees powder can be assessed as a favorable candidate for not only protein-rich but also hypolipidemic provisions.
  • [MeSH-major] Alcoholic Beverages / analysis. Dietary Proteins / analysis. Nutritive Value. Oryza
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acids / analysis. Animals. Biological Availability. Dietary Carbohydrates / analysis. Dietary Fats / analysis. Dietary Fiber / analysis. Digestion. Freeze Drying. Male. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Water / analysis. Weight Gain

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  • (PMID = 9591244.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-4800
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nutritional science and vitaminology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr. Sci. Vitaminol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] JAPAN
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amino Acids; 0 / Dietary Carbohydrates; 0 / Dietary Fats; 0 / Dietary Proteins; 059QF0KO0R / Water
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8. Yamamoto Y, Mendel E, Raffel C: Acrylic cranioplasty with alginate molding: technical note. Neurosurgery; 1997 Jul;41(1):305-6; discussion 306-9
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  • [Title] Acrylic cranioplasty with alginate molding: technical note.
  • OBJECTIVE: Acrylic cranioplasty for cranial defects is a common neurosurgical procedure that is performed when the original bone flap becomes infected or is unusable for other reasons.
  • We developed a simple technique to produce a complete copy of the original bone flap from acrylic, using alginate impression material as a mold.
  • METHODS: Alginate impression material was used to form a mold of the patient's original bone flap.
  • Methylmethacrylate was then placed inside the mold to create an exact duplicate of the bone flap.
  • The acrylic flap was sterilized with gamma irradiation and used for cranioplasty.
  • Two patients who had cranial defects secondary to infections of their craniotomy bone flaps underwent cranioplasty with this technique.
  • RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A perfect copy of the patient's original bone flap was easily and quickly created with this technique, and excellent cosmetic results were obtained.
  • Operative time was shortened because the prosthesis was preformed before the operation.
  • This technique can also be used to mold large or complex cranial defects as long as the original bone flap is available and there is no major cranial remodeling around the defect.
  • [MeSH-major] Alginates. Craniotomy / methods. Dental Impression Materials. Methylmethacrylates. Prostheses and Implants
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Methylmethacrylate. Reoperation. Sterilization

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  • (PMID = 9218324.001).
  • [ISSN] 0148-396X
  • [Journal-full-title] Neurosurgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosurgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Alginates; 0 / Dental Impression Materials; 0 / Methylmethacrylates; 196OC77688 / Methylmethacrylate
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9. Ueda H, Yamamoto Y, Yanagita N: Effect of aspirin on transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions in guinea pigs. ORL J Otorhinolaryngol Relat Spec; 1996 Mar-Apr;58(2):61-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of aspirin on transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions in guinea pigs.
  • Aspirin and other salicylates influence otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), but changes in transiently evoked OAEs (TEOAEs) following aspirin intake have not been studied experimentally.
  • We examined the changes in TEOAEs, together with auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), in guinea pigs before and after the intravenous injection of aspirin (100 and 400 mg/kg).
  • TEOAE power decreased slowly after the injection in a dose-dependent manner.
  • Mean minimal values were detected 20 min after the injection of 100 mg/kg, and 40 min after the injection of 400 mg/kg.
  • TEOAE power recovered slowly.
  • These changes were paralleled by shifts in ABR thresholds.
  • The magnitude of the decrease in the frequency components in the TEOAE frequency power spectrum was similar.
  • In one guinea pig, TEOAE power returned to the pretreatment level 7 h after the injection.
  • Findings support the results of in vitro studies that salicylates affect electromotility in isolated outer hair cells from guinea pig cochlea.
  • [MeSH-major] Aspirin / toxicity. Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Brain Stem / drug effects. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem / drug effects. Guinea Pigs. Hair Cells, Auditory, Outer / drug effects. Injections, Intravenous. Reference Values

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID .
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  • (PMID = 8736048.001).
  • [ISSN] 0301-1569
  • [Journal-full-title] ORL; journal for oto-rhino-laryngology and its related specialties
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ORL J. Otorhinolaryngol. Relat. Spec.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] SWITZERLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] R16CO5Y76E / Aspirin
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10. Yamamoto Y, Sakurai M, Asari S: Towne (half-axial) and semisagittal computed tomography in the evaluation of blow-out fractures of the orbit. J Comput Assist Tomogr; 1983 Apr;7(2):306-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Towne (half-axial) and semisagittal computed tomography in the evaluation of blow-out fractures of the orbit.
  • Three cases of blow-out fractures of the orbit were evaluated by Towne and semisagittal computed tomography (CT).
  • The Towne CT well delineated the inferior rectus muscle, the orbital floor, and the entrapped orbital contents, including a bony fragment in the maxillary sinus.
  • The semisagittal CT plane was optimal for lateral delineation of the orbit, although there is need for improvement in the head positioning and gantry width.
  • Postoperative recovery of impaired eye movements was related to CT findings.
  • [MeSH-major] Orbit / radiography. Orbital Fractures / radiography. Skull Fractures / radiography. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Humans. Male. Oculomotor Muscles / injuries

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - CT Scans.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Head Injuries.
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  • (PMID = 6833565.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-8715
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of computer assisted tomography
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Comput Assist Tomogr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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