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Items 1 to 10 of about 13815
1. Porcher C, Bagnol D, Watson SJ: Opioid peptide mRNA expression in the colon of the rat. Neurosci Lett; 1999 Sep 10;272(2):111-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Opioid peptide mRNA expression in the colon of the rat.
  • Since the discovery of opioid peptides, several immunohistochemical and radioimmunological studies have demonstrated their localization in the gastrointestinal tract without demonstrating the localization of their common precursor.
  • The present study describes the distribution and the colocalization of proenkephalin and prodynorphin messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the colon of rat by in situ hybridization.
  • Proenkephalin and prodynorphin mRNAs were found in myenteric plexus, but not in the submucous plexus or in the mucosa.
  • In myenteric plexus, the number of neurons expressing proenkephalin is 2.5 times greater than that of the neurons expressing only prodynorphin.
  • Furthermore, double in situ hybridization histochemistry indicates that at least three groups of opioid neurons can be distinguished, those containing proenkephalin and prodynorphin mRNAs together, and those containing only proenkephalin mRNA or only prodynorphin mRNA.
  • [MeSH-major] Colon / metabolism. Enkephalins / genetics. Protein Precursors / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Autoradiography. In Situ Hybridization. RNA, Messenger / analysis. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 10507554.001).
  • [ISSN] 0304-3940
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuroscience letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurosci. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] IRELAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enkephalins; 0 / Protein Precursors; 0 / RNA, Messenger; 0 / proenkephalin; 93443-35-7 / preproenkephalin
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2. Gao P, Wang P: Clinical observation on termination of early pregnancy of 213 cases after caesarian section with repeated use of mifepristone and misoprostol. Reprod Contracept; 1999;10(4):227-33
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  • [Title] Clinical observation on termination of early pregnancy of 213 cases after caesarian section with repeated use of mifepristone and misoprostol.
  • The aim was to investigate the efficacy and safety in women after cesarean section of termination of early pregnancy by treatment, or repeated treatment, with mifepristone and misoprostol.
  • A total of 213 pregnant women with amenorrhea of 34-69 days after cesarean section who asked for medical abortion were recruited, including 63 cases undergoing their second medical abortion.
  • A total amount of mifepristone of 150 mg, given in separate doses (4 doses of 25 mg following a first dose of 50 mg), was administered orally within 3 days, followed by misoprostol (0.6 mg orally) the morning of day 3.
  • The complete abortion rate was 92.5%, while the incomplete abortion rate was 4.7% and the abortion failure rate was 2.8%.
  • The sequential use of mifepristone and misoprostol could be successfully and repeatedly used for induced abortion in those women with a cesarean section history.
  • Its efficacy was similar to that for the ordinary population.
  • Its safety and effectiveness were satisfactory.
  • [MeSH-major] Abortion, Induced. Cesarean Section. Mifepristone. Misoprostol. Research. Risk Assessment
  • [MeSH-minor] Asia. Biology. China. Developing Countries. Endocrine System. Evaluation Studies as Topic. Family Planning Services. Far East. General Surgery. Hormone Antagonists. Hormones. Obstetric Surgical Procedures. Physiology. Prostaglandins. Prostaglandins, Synthetic. Therapeutics

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  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MIFEPRISTONE .
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  • (PMID = 12349659.001).
  • [ISSN] 1001-7844
  • [Journal-full-title] Reproduction and contraception
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Reprod Contracept
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] CHINA
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hormone Antagonists; 0 / Hormones; 0 / Prostaglandins; 0 / Prostaglandins, Synthetic; 0E43V0BB57 / Misoprostol; 320T6RNW1F / Mifepristone
  • [Other-IDs] PIP/ 150403; POP/ 00295538
  • [Keywords] PIP ; Abortion, Drug Induced (major topic) / Cesarean Section (major topic) / Clinical Research (major topic) / Misoprostol (major topic) / Research Report (major topic) / Risk Assessment (major topic) / Ru-486 (major topic) / Abortion, Induced / Asia / Biology / China / Developing Countries / Eastern Asia / Endocrine System / Evaluation / Family Planning / Fertility Control, Postconception / Hormone Antagonists / Hormones / Obstetrical Surgery / Physiology / Prostaglandins / Prostaglandins, Synthetic / Research Methodology / Surgery / Treatment
  • [General-notes] PIP/ TJ: REPRODUCTION AND CONTRACEPTION
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3. Huang L, El-Hussein A, Xuan W, Hamblin MR: Potentiation by potassium iodide reveals that the anionic porphyrin TPPS4 is a surprisingly effective photosensitizer for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation. J Photochem Photobiol B; 2017 Oct 31;178:277-286
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Potentiation by potassium iodide reveals that the anionic porphyrin TPPS4 is a surprisingly effective photosensitizer for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation.
  • We recently reported that addition of the non-toxic salt, potassium iodide can potentiate antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation of a broad-spectrum of microorganisms, producing many extra logs of killing.
  • If the photosensitizer (PS) can bind to the microbial cells, then delivering light in the presence of KI produces short-lived reactive iodine species, while if the cells are added after light the killing is caused by molecular iodine produced as a result of singlet oxygen-mediated oxidation of iodide.
  • In an attempt to show the importance of PS-bacterial binding, we compared two charged porphyrins, TPPS4 (thought to be anionic and not able to bind to Gram-negative bacteria) and TMPyP4 (considered cationic and well able to bind to bacteria).
  • As expected TPPS4+light did not kill Gram-negative Escherichia coli, but surprisingly when 100mM KI was added, it was highly effective (eradication at 200nM+10J/cm<sup>2</sup> of 415nm light).
  • TPPS4 was more effective than TMPyP4 in eradicating the Gram-positive bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the fungal yeast Candida albicans (regardless of KI).
  • TPPS4 was also highly active against E. coli after a centrifugation step when KI was added, suggesting that the supposedly anionic porphyrin bound to bacteria and Candida.
  • This was confirmed by uptake experiments.
  • We compared the phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate derivative (ClAlPCS4), which did not bind to bacteria or allow KI-mediated killing of E. coli after a spin, suggesting it was truly anionic.
  • We conclude that TPPS4 behaves as if it has some cationic character in the presence of bacteria, which may be related to its delivery from suppliers in the form of a dihydrochloride salt.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 29172135.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-2682
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of photochemistry and photobiology. B, Biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Photochem. Photobiol. B, Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI050875; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R21 AI121700
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Anionic porphyrin / Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation / Cationic porphyrin / ClAlPCS4 / Potassium iodide / TMPyP4 / TPPS4
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4. Wang P, Zhu G: Synthesis and characterization of two novel [Ru(bpy)(2)(phen)](2+)-based electrochemiluminescent labels. Luminescence; 2000 Jul-Aug;15(4):261-5
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  • [Title] Synthesis and characterization of two novel [Ru(bpy)(2)(phen)](2+)-based electrochemiluminescent labels.
  • Two novel electrochemiluminescent labels, bis(2, 2'-bipyridine)[5-(3-carboxylic acid-propionamido)-1, 10-phenanthroline]ruthenium(II) hexafluorophosphate dihydrate and bis(2,2'-bipyridine)[5-(4-carboxylic acid-butanamido)-1, 10-phenanthroline]ruthenium(II) hexafluorophosphate dihydrate, were synthesized and confirmed by IRelemental analysis, and (1)H-NMR spectra were completely assigned using the (1)H-(1)H COSY technique.
  • Cyclic voltammograms with different scan rates showed quasi-reversible electrochemical behaviour of the two Ru (II) complex labels in MeCN solution.
  • Electronic absorption, photoluminescence and electrochemiluminescence of Ru(II) complexes were also characterized.
  • [MeSH-major] Electrochemistry / methods. Luminescent Measurements. Molecular Probes. Organometallic Compounds / chemical synthesis. Phenanthrolines / chemical synthesis. Ruthenium
  • [MeSH-minor] Molecular Structure

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • (PMID = 10931640.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-7235
  • [Journal-full-title] Luminescence : the journal of biological and chemical luminescence
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Luminescence
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Molecular Probes; 0 / Organometallic Compounds; 0 / Phenanthrolines; 7UI0TKC3U5 / Ruthenium
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5. Xuan W, Vatansever F, Huang L, Hamblin MR: Transcranial low-level laser therapy enhances learning, memory, and neuroprogenitor cells after traumatic brain injury in mice. J Biomed Opt; 2014;19(10):108003
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  • [Title] Transcranial low-level laser therapy enhances learning, memory, and neuroprogenitor cells after traumatic brain injury in mice.
  • The use of transcranial low-level laser (light) therapy (tLLLT) to treat stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) is attracting increasing attention.
  • We previously showed that LLLT using an 810-nm laser 4 h after controlled cortical impact (CCI)-TBI in mice could significantly improve the neurological severity score, decrease lesion volume, and reduce Fluoro-Jade staining for degenerating neurons.
  • We obtained some evidence for neurogenesis in the region of the lesion.
  • We now tested the hypothesis that tLLLT can improve performance on the Morris water maze (MWM, learning, and memory) and increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ) after CCI-TBI in mice.
  • One and (to a greater extent) three daily laser treatments commencing 4-h post-TBI improved neurological performance as measured by wire grip and motion test especially at 3 and 4 weeks post-TBI.
  • Improvements in visible and hidden platform latency and probe tests in MWM were seen at 4 weeks.
  • Caspase-3 expression was lower in the lesion region at 4 days post-TBI.
  • Double-stained BrdU-NeuN (neuroprogenitor cells) was increased in the dentate gyrus and SVZ.
  • Increases in double-cortin (DCX) and TUJ-1 were also seen.
  • Our study results suggest that tLLLT may improve TBI both by reducing cell death in the lesion and by stimulating neurogenesis.

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  • (PMID = 25292167.001).
  • [ISSN] 1560-2281
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biomedical optics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Biomed Opt
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01AI050875
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fluoresceins; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / NeuN protein, mouse; 0 / Nuclear Proteins; 0 / Tubulin; 0 / fluoro jade; EC 3.4.22.- / Casp3 protein, mouse; EC 3.4.22.- / Caspase 3
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4189010
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6. Van Norman JM, Xuan W, Beeckman T, Benfey PN: To branch or not to branch: the role of pre-patterning in lateral root formation. Development; 2013 Nov;140(21):4301-10
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  • [Title] To branch or not to branch: the role of pre-patterning in lateral root formation.
  • The establishment of a pre-pattern or competence to form new organs is a key feature of the postembryonic plasticity of plant development, and the elaboration of such pre-patterns leads to remarkable heterogeneity in plant form.
  • In root systems, many of the differences in architecture can be directly attributed to the outgrowth of lateral roots.
  • In recent years, efforts have focused on understanding how the pattern of lateral roots is established.
  • Here, we review recent findings that point to a periodic mechanism for establishing this pattern, as well as roles for plant hormones, particularly auxin, in the earliest steps leading up to lateral root primordium development.
  • In addition, we compare the development of lateral root primordia with in vitro plant regeneration and discuss possible common molecular mechanisms.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Patterning / physiology. Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental / physiology. Gene Expression Regulation, Plant / physiology. Indoleacetic Acids / metabolism. Plant Roots / growth & development. Regeneration / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Differentiation / physiology. Cell Lineage / physiology. Models, Biological

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  • (PMID = 24130327.001).
  • [ISSN] 1477-9129
  • [Journal-full-title] Development (Cambridge, England)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Development
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Indoleacetic Acids
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4007709
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Auxin / Callus formation / Lateral root development / Periodic gene expression / Pre-patterning
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7. Xie K, Wang P: Clinical study on effect of HBO plus electric stimulation on treatment for the vegetative state. Acta Neurochir Suppl; 2003;87:19-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical study on effect of HBO plus electric stimulation on treatment for the vegetative state.
  • We proposed neurological diagnostic criteria and new scoring system for the vegetative state (VS).
  • According to these criteria and scoring system, we examined the effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment in 130 cases of vs. As compared with non-HBO treatment, HBO treated patients showed statistically significant recovery from vs.
  • [MeSH-major] Electric Stimulation Therapy / methods. Hyperbaric Oxygenation / methods. Persistent Vegetative State / diagnosis. Persistent Vegetative State / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Combined Modality Therapy. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Severity of Illness Index. Spinal Cord. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 14518517.001).
  • [ISSN] 0065-1419
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta neurochirurgica. Supplement
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Neurochir. Suppl.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Austria
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8. Zeng G, Zhang R, Xuan W, Wang W, Liang FS: Constructing de novo H2O2 signaling via induced protein proximity. ACS Chem Biol; 2015 Jun 19;10(6):1404-10
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  • [Title] Constructing de novo H2O2 signaling via induced protein proximity.
  • A new chemical strategy has been developed to generate de novo signaling pathways that link a signaling molecule, H2O2, to different downstream cellular events in mammalian cells.
  • This approach combines the reactivity-based H2O2 sensing with the chemically induced protein proximity technology.
  • By chemically modifying abscisic acid with an H2O2-sensitive boronate ester probe, novel H2O2 signaling pathways can be engineered to induce transcription, protein translocation and membrane ruffle formation upon exogenous or endogenous H2O2 stimulation.
  • This strategy has also been successfully applied to gibberellic acid, which provides the potential to build signaling networks based on orthogonal cell stimuli.
  • [MeSH-major] Abscisic Acid / chemistry. Cell Engineering. Gibberellins / chemistry. Hydrogen Peroxide / metabolism. Signal Transduction
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Boronic Acids / chemistry. CHO Cells. Cricetulus. Genes, Reporter. Green Fluorescent Proteins / genetics. Green Fluorescent Proteins / metabolism. HEK293 Cells. Humans. Molecular Probes / chemistry. Plasmids / chemistry. Plasmids / metabolism. Protein Transport. Transcription, Genetic. Transfection

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. GIBBERELLIC ACID .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE .
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  • (PMID = 25775006.001).
  • [ISSN] 1554-8937
  • [Journal-full-title] ACS chemical biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] ACS Chem. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA118100
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Boronic Acids; 0 / Gibberellins; 0 / Molecular Probes; 0 / enhanced green fluorescent protein; 147336-22-9 / Green Fluorescent Proteins; 72S9A8J5GW / Abscisic Acid; BBX060AN9V / Hydrogen Peroxide; BU0A7MWB6L / gibberellic acid
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS774561; NLM/ PMC4849873
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9. Zhang X, Xuan W, Yin P, Wang L, Wu X, Wu Q: Gastric tonometry guided therapy in critical care patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Crit Care; 2015;19:22
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  • [Title] Gastric tonometry guided therapy in critical care patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
  • INTRODUCTION: The value of gastric intramucosal pH (pHi) can be calculated from the tonometrically measured partial pressure of carbon dioxide ([Formula: see text]) in the stomach and the arterial bicarbonate content.
  • Low pHi and increase of the difference between gastric mucosal and arterial [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text] gap) reflect splanchnic hypoperfusion and are good indicators of poor prognosis.
  • Some randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were performed based on the theory that normalizing the low pHi or [Formula: see text] gap could improve the outcomes of critical care patients.
  • However, the conclusions of these RCTs were divergent.
  • Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effects of this goal directed therapy on patient outcome in Intensive Care Units (ICUs).
  • METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and ClinicalTrials.gov for randomized controlled trials comparing gastric tonometry guided therapy with control groups.
  • Baseline characteristics of each included RCT were extracted and displayed in a table.
  • We calculated pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous outcomes.
  • Another measure of effect (risk difference, RD) was used to reassess the effects of gastric tonometry on total mortality.
  • We performed sensitivity analysis for total mortality.
  • Continuous outcomes were presented as standardised mean differences (SMDs) together with 95% CIs.
  • RESULTS: The gastric tonometry guided therapy significantly reduced total mortality (OR, 0.732; 95% CI, 0.536 to 0.999, P = 0.049; I(2) = 0%; RD, -0.056; 95% CI, -0.109 to -0.003, P = 0.038; I(2) = 0%) when compared with control groups.
  • However, after excluding the patients with normal pHi on admission, the beneficial effects of this therapy did not exist (OR, 0.736; 95% CI 0.506 to 1.071, P = 0.109; I(2) = 0%).
  • ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay and days intubated were not significantly improved by this therapy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In critical care patients, gastric tonometry guided therapy can reduce total mortality.
  • Patients with normal pHi on admission contributed to the ultimate result of this outcome; it may indicate that these patients may be more sensitive to this therapy.
  • [MeSH-major] Critical Care / methods. Intensive Care Units / standards. Manometry / utilization. Stomach Diseases / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans


10. Zuo W, Wang P: [Comparative study on assessment of tubal patency among tubal insufflation, hydrotubation, hysterosalpingography and chromotubation under laparoscopy]. Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi; 1996 Jan;31(1):29-31
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  • [Title] [Comparative study on assessment of tubal patency among tubal insufflation, hydrotubation, hysterosalpingography and chromotubation under laparoscopy].
  • OBJECTIVES: To compare the diagnostic value of tubal insufflation, hydrotubation, hysterosalpingography (HSG) and chromotubation under laparoscopy for tubal patency assessment.
  • METHODS: Among 258 women who underwent chromofubation during laparoscopy procedures for infertility assessment in our hospital, tubal insufflation were performed in 42 cases, hydrotubation in 70, HSG in 63, both insufflation and hydrotubation in 20, insufflation and HSG in 11, and hydrotubation and HSG in 22.
  • The accuracy of each method was compared with that of chromotubation under laparoscopy.
  • RESULTS: The accuracy rates of hydrotubation (87.1%) and HSG (73.0%) were significantly higher than that of insufflation (50.0%) (P < 0.01, P < 0.05 respectively).
  • Similar results were shown when 2 different procedures in the same patient were compared with laparoscopy.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Tubal insufflation has no longer its place in tubal patency assessment due to its grossly inaccuracy; Both hydrotubation and HSG can be used as screening methods.
  • Laparoscopy is the most accurate procedure in assessing tubal patency, as well as in searching pelvic abnormalities.
  • [MeSH-major] Fallopian Tube Patency Tests / methods. Infertility, Female / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Fallopian Tube Diseases / complications. Female. Humans. Hysterosalpingography. Insufflation. Intubation. Laparoscopy

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Female Infertility.
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  • (PMID = 8758816.001).
  • [ISSN] 0529-567X
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua fu chan ke za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] CHINA
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