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Items 1 to 10 of about 691
1. Knaus WA, Kalayoglu M: Echinococcus cysts of the liver. Observations and reflections based on a medical student's summer spent in Turkey, 1971. Clin Pediatr (Phila); 1973 Mar;12(3):128-30
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  • [Title] Echinococcus cysts of the liver. Observations and reflections based on a medical student's summer spent in Turkey, 1971.
  • [MeSH-major] Echinococcosis, Hepatic / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Drainage. Education, Medical, Undergraduate. Humans. International Educational Exchange. Male. Methods. Postoperative Complications / prevention & control. Radiography. Skin Tests. Turkey. West Virginia

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  • (PMID = 4701462.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-9228
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinical pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Pediatr (Phila)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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2. Shu J: [Transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery for diseases in the ethmoid-sphenoid area]. Lin Chuang Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi; 2002 Nov;16(11):584-5
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  • [Title] [Transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery for diseases in the ethmoid-sphenoid area].
  • OBJECTIVE: To explore the proprieties of diseases in the ethmoid-sphenoid area and improve the effects of treatment and diagnose of these kinds of diseases.
  • METHOD: 51 cases of diseases in the ethmoid-sphenoid areas,who had undergone transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery, were investigated.
  • Among them, 41 cases of diseases in the ethmoid-sphenoid area involved at the same time were undergone surgery by ethmoid approach, 10 cases with isolated sphenoid diseases were done via nasal cavity.
  • RESULT: Forty-eight cases did not develop serious complications after surgical treatments, and 3 cases recurrence during the follow-up.
  • CONCLUSION: Diseases in the ethmoid-sphenoid area readily ignored because there are few specific early-stage symptoms.
  • Computer-tomographer scan is helpful to the diagnose and introductive to the procedure of surgery.
  • Transnasal endoscopic sinus surgery can make patients suffer less, and leaves no scar in the face.
  • [MeSH-major] Endoscopy / methods. Ethmoid Sinus / surgery. Paranasal Sinus Diseases / surgery. Sphenoid Sinus / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 15515542.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Lin chuang er bi yan hou ke za zhi = Journal of clinical otorhinolaryngology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Lin Chuang Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] China
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3. Lai N, Zeng X, Li M, Shu J: Leydig cell tumor with lung metastasis diagnosed by lung biopsy. Int J Clin Exp Pathol; 2015;8(10):12972-6
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  • [Title] Leydig cell tumor with lung metastasis diagnosed by lung biopsy.
  • Leydig cell tumors are very rare and account for only 3% of testicular tumors and are generally benign.
  • Only less than 0.2% of all testicular cancers were evidenced by metastatic spread.
  • We report a 34-year-old man visited hospital because of coughing sputum mixed with blood.
  • His chest CT showed bilateral patch clouding opacity.
  • He was suspected with allergic alveolitis and treated with methylprednisolone.
  • However, his symptoms and general condition deteriorated, and he visited our hospital.
  • He had no abnormal findings on physical examination.
  • A chest radiograph showed pneumonia in whole lung and CT showed multiple nodules and diffused ground glass opacities in both lung fields.
  • Lung biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of Leydig cell tumor with lung metastasis.
  • The diagnosis is based on the histopathology and immunohistochemistry.
  • [MeSH-major] Leydig Cell Tumor / secondary. Lung Neoplasms / secondary. Testicular Neoplasms / pathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Biopsy. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. Male

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  • (PMID = 26722493.001).
  • [ISSN] 1936-2625
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of clinical and experimental pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Clin Exp Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4680438
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Leydig cell tumors / immunohistochemistry / lung biopsy / lung metastasis
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4. Li X, Xu S, Cheng Y, Shu J: HSPB1 polymorphisms might be associated with radiation-induced damage risk in lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Tumour Biol; 2016 May;37(5):5743-9
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  • [Title] HSPB1 polymorphisms might be associated with radiation-induced damage risk in lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy.
  • Several studies investigating the association between heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1) polymorphisms and radiation-induced damage in lung cancer patients administrated with radiotherapy have derived conflicting results.
  • This meta-analysis aimed to assess the association between the HSPB1 genes' (rs2868370 and rs2868371) polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced damage in lung cancer patients.
  • After an electronic literature search, four articles including six studies were found to be eligible for this meta-analysis.
  • No association was observed between rs2868370 genotypes and radiation-induced damage risk.
  • However, rs2868371 showed a statistically increased risk of radiation-induced damage under CC vs. CG/GG model (OR = 1.59, 95 % CI = 1.10-2.29).
  • Subgroup analysis by ethnicity showed that the genotypes of rs2868371 were also associated with a significantly increased risk of radiation-induced damage in CC vs. CG/GG model (OR = 1.86, 95 % CI = 1.21-2.83) among mixed ethnicities which are mainly comprised of white people.
  • When the data was stratified by organ-damaged, a significant association was only observed in the esophagus group (OR = 2.94, 95 % CI = 1.35-6.37, for CC vs. CG/GG model).
  • In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the rs2868371 genotypes of HSPB1 might be associated with radiation-induced esophagus damage risk, especially in Caucasians but not in the Asian population.
  • [MeSH-major] Heat-Shock Proteins / genetics. Lung Neoplasms / genetics. Neoplasm Proteins / genetics. Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide. Radiation Injuries / genetics. Radiotherapy / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Asian Continental Ancestry Group / genetics. Cytokines / secretion. Esophagus / radiation effects. European Continental Ancestry Group / genetics. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Genotype. Humans. Lung / radiation effects. Risk

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  • (PMID = 26874728.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0380
  • [Journal-full-title] Tumour biology : the journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tumour Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / HSBP1 protein, human; 0 / Heat-Shock Proteins; 0 / Neoplasm Proteins
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Damage / HSPB1 / Lung cancer / Polymorphism / Radiotherapy
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5. Bone RC, Balk RA, Cerra FB, Dellinger RP, Fein AM, Knaus WA, Schein RM, Sibbald WJ: Definitions for sepsis and organ failure and guidelines for the use of innovative therapies in sepsis. The ACCP/SCCM Consensus Conference Committee. American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine. Chest; 1992 Jun;101(6):1644-55
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  • [Title] Definitions for sepsis and organ failure and guidelines for the use of innovative therapies in sepsis. The ACCP/SCCM Consensus Conference Committee. American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine.
  • An American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine Consensus Conference was held in Northbrook in August 1991 with the goal of agreeing on a set of definitions that could be applied to patients with sepsis and its sequelae.
  • New definitions were offered for some terms, while others were discarded.
  • Broad definitions of sepsis and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome were proposed, along with detailed physiologic parameters by which a patient may be categorized.
  • Definitions for severe sepsis, septic shock, hypotension, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome were also offered.
  • The use of severity scoring methods when dealing with septic patients was recommended as an adjunctive tool to assess mortality.
  • Appropriate methods and applications for the use and testing of new therapies were recommended.
  • The use of these terms and techniques should assist clinicians and researchers who deal with sepsis and its sequelae.
  • [MeSH-major] Critical Care / standards. Multiple Organ Failure / therapy. Sepsis / therapy. Terminology as Topic
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Pulmonary Medicine. Severity of Illness Index. Shock, Septic / therapy. Societies, Medical. Syndrome. United States


6. Hakim RB, Teno JM, Harrell FE Jr, Knaus WA, Wenger N, Phillips RS, Layde P, Califf R, Connors AF Jr, Lynn J: Factors associated with do-not-resuscitate orders: patients' preferences, prognoses, and physicians' judgments. SUPPORT Investigators. Study to Understand Prognoses and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatment. Ann Intern Med; 1996 Aug 15;125(4):284-93
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  • [Title] Factors associated with do-not-resuscitate orders: patients' preferences, prognoses, and physicians' judgments. SUPPORT Investigators. Study to Understand Prognoses and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatment.
  • BACKGROUND: Medical treatment decisions should be based on the preferences of informed patients or their proxies and on the expected outcomes of treatment.
  • Because seriously ill patients are at risk for cardiac arrest, examination of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) practices affecting them provides useful insights into the associations between various factors and medical decision making.
  • OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between patients' preferences for resuscitation (along with other patient and physician characteristics) and the frequency and timing of DNR orders.
  • DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.
  • SETTING: 5 teaching hospitals.
  • PATIENTS: 6802 seriously ill hospitalized patients enrolled in the Study to Understand Prognoses and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatment (SUPPORT) between 1989 and 1994.
  • MEASUREMENTS: Patients and their surrogates were interviewed about patients' cardiopulmonary resuscitation preferences, medical records were reviewed to determine disease severity, and a multivariable regression model was constructed to predict the time to the first DNR order.
  • RESULTS: The patients' preference for cardiopulmonary resuscitation was the most important predictor of the timing of DNR orders, but only 52% of patients who preferred not to be resuscitated actually had DNR orders written.
  • The probability of surviving for 2 months was the next most important predictor of the timing of DNR orders.
  • Although DNR orders were not linearly related to the probability of surviving for 2 months, they were written earlier and more frequently for patients with a 50% or lower probability of surviving for 2 months.
  • Orders were written more quickly for patients older than 75 years of age, regardless of prognosis.
  • After adjustment for these and other influential patient characteristics, the use and timing of DNR orders varied significantly among physician specialties and among hospitals.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients' preferences and short-term prognoses are associated with the timing of DNR orders.
  • However, the substantial variation seen among hospital sites and among physician specialties suggests that there is room for improvement.
  • In this study, DNR orders were written earlier for patients older than 75 years of age, regardless of prognosis.
  • This finding suggests that physicians may be using age in a way that is inconsistent with the reported association between age and survival.
  • The process for making decisions about DNR orders needs to be improved if such orders are to routinely and accurately reflect patients' preferences and probable outcomes.
  • [MeSH-major] Patient Selection. Resuscitation Orders
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Patients. Physicians. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Quality of Life. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 8678391.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4819
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Other-IDs] KIE/ 51587
  • [Keywords] KIE ; Study to Understand Prognoses and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatments (SUPPORT) (major topic) / Death and Euthanasia / Empirical Approach
  • [General-notes] KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: resuscitation orders; KIE/ KIE BoB Subject Heading: selection for treatment; KIE/ For the SUPPORT Investigators; KIE/ Full author name: Hakim, Rosemarie B; KIE/ Full author name: Teno, Joan M; KIE/ Full author name: Harrell, Frank E; KIE/ Full author name: Knaus, William A; KIE/ Full author name: Wenger, Neil; KIE/ Full author name: Phillips, Russell S; KIE/ Full author name: Layde, Peter; KIE/ Full author name: Califf, Robert; KIE/ Full author name: Connors, Alfred F; KIE/ Full author name: Lynn, Joanne
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7. Knaus WA, Harrell FE Jr, LaBrecque JF, Wagner DP, Pribble JP, Draper EA, Fisher CJ Jr, Soll L: Use of predicted risk of mortality to evaluate the efficacy of anticytokine therapy in sepsis. The rhIL-1ra Phase III Sepsis Syndrome Study Group. Crit Care Med; 1996 Jan;24(1):46-56
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  • [Title] Use of predicted risk of mortality to evaluate the efficacy of anticytokine therapy in sepsis. The rhIL-1ra Phase III Sepsis Syndrome Study Group.
  • OBJECTIVES: To investigate a novel anticytokine therapy in patients with sepsis syndrome, and the relationship between a patient's baseline mortality risk and survival benefit.
  • DESIGN: Data from a recent phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial with patients randomized to three treatment arms: an intravenous loading dose of recombinant human interleukin-1-receptor antagonist (rhIL-1ra) or placebo, followed by a continuous infusion of rhIL-1ra (1.0 mg/kg/hr, or 2.0 mg/kg/hr), or placebo for 72 hrs.
  • SETTING: Sixty-three investigative centers in eight countries.
  • PATIENTS: The study population consisted of 893 patients: 302 placebo patients; 298 patients treated with 1.0 mg/kg/hr of rhIL-1ra; and 293 patients treated with 2.0 mg/kg/hr of rhIL-1ra.
  • MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: An independent, sepsis-specific, log-normal regression model that predicts the risk of mortality over 28 days was applied to all patients enrolled into the rhIL-1ra sepsis study.
  • The ability of the Predicted Risk of Mortality model to predict 28-day mortality in the placebo patients was determined and the relationship between mortality risk and efficacy of rhIL-1ra was investigated.
  • The trial data were also analyzed using two other risk-assessment models for comparison with Predicted Risk of Mortality.
  • A significant increase in survival time was demonstrated for all patients treated with rhIL-1ra (n = 893, p < .02 Predicted Risk of Mortality log-normal), but patients with a Predicted Risk of Mortality of < 24% derived little benefit.
  • Retrospective examination of time-to-death data demonstrated that rhIL-1ra reduced risk of death in the first 2 days for patients with > or = 24% Predicted Risk of Mortality (n = 580, p < .005 Predicted Risk of Mortality log-normal).
  • This same effect was not present in patients with a Predicted Risk of Mortality of < 24% on entry into the study.
  • The Predicted Risk of Mortality model predicted a 28-day mortality rate of 35% for placebo patients compared with 34% observed and accurately stratified patients along the full range of risks.
  • There was a wide distribution of individual patient risks for 28-day mortality for all patients, as well as within categorical subgroups, such as shock and organ system dysfunction.
  • Two alternate risk models were assessed and the Acute Physiology Score of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III also demonstrated a statistically significant survival benefit for rhIL-1ra (p = .04 Predicted Risk of Mortality log-normal) for all patients treated.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Using an appropriate analytic model, a statistically significant increase in survival time from rhIL-1ra was measured.
  • A direct relationship was found between a patient's Predicted Risk of Mortality at study entry to efficacy of rhIL-1ra.
  • Individual risk or severity assessment may be a useful tool for evaluating the clinical benefit of new therapeutic approaches to sepsis and for monitoring outcomes at the bedside.
  • [MeSH-major] Sialoglycoproteins / therapeutic use. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] APACHE. Double-Blind Method. Female. Humans. Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein. Interleukin-1 / antagonists & inhibitors. Male. Middle Aged. Models, Statistical. ROC Curve. Recombinant Proteins. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors. Severity of Illness Index. Survival Rate

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  • (PMID = 8565538.001).
  • [ISSN] 0090-3493
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Care Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / HS 7137
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Clinical Trial, Phase III; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / IL1RN protein, human; 0 / Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein; 0 / Interleukin-1; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 0 / Sialoglycoproteins
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8. Chen ZF, Shu J, Ma JT, Ni ZM, Mu ZW: [A study of transpial migration of implanted serotonergic neurons in rat spinal cord]. Sheng Li Xue Bao; 1993 Apr;45(2):103-10
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  • [Title] [A study of transpial migration of implanted serotonergic neurons in rat spinal cord].
  • Transpial migration of implanted 5-HT neurons from the subarachnoid space into the spinal cord was studied in adult Wistar rats.
  • Embryonic raphe tissue or cell suspension containing 5-HT cells was used as grafts.
  • The implanted 5-HT cells were monitored by 5-HT immunohistochemical method.
  • The results are as follows:.
  • (1) 10 d after cutting the spinal cord at lower thoracic level, 5-HT fibers disappeared in the transected spinal cord. (2) Raphe tissue was implanted into the subarachnoid space of the thoracic lumbar segment after the spinal cord was cut.
  • One month later, 5-HT positive cells could be found in the transected spinal cord with fibers extending into both the grey and the white matters. (3) If the raphe cell suspension instead was implanted, a number of 5-HT positive cells appeared in the grey matter near the implanted region and the distribution of these cells in the grey matter was quite consistent with the implanted range of the cell suspension in the subarachnoid space.
  • The 5-HT positive cells which had entered into the spinal cord sent out fibers and reestablished a new fiber network in the grey matter. (4) After implantation, the number of the 5-HT positive fibers in the transected grey matter became more and more sparsely distributed with increasing distance from the cell bodies and the 5-HT positive fibers reappeared in the white matter were much less than that in the grey matter.
  • Present results show that the implanted 5-HT neurons are able to migrate transpially from the subarachnoid space into the spinal cord.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Stem / transplantation. Brain Tissue Transplantation. Fetal Tissue Transplantation. Serotonin / physiology. Spinal Cord / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Movement / physiology. Female. Immunohistochemistry. Neurons / physiology. Neurons / transplantation. Pregnancy. Raphe Nuclei / cytology. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Subarachnoid Space / surgery

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  • (PMID = 8356465.001).
  • [ISSN] 0371-0874
  • [Journal-full-title] Sheng li xue bao : [Acta physiologica Sinica]
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sheng Li Xue Bao
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] CHINA
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 333DO1RDJY / Serotonin
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9. Fu X, Xing L, Xu W, Shu J: Treatment with estrogen protects against ovariectomy-induced hepatic steatosis by increasing AQP7 expression. Mol Med Rep; 2016 Jul;14(1):425-31
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  • [Title] Treatment with estrogen protects against ovariectomy-induced hepatic steatosis by increasing AQP7 expression.
  • Recent evidence has suggested that the marked decrease in ovarian secretion of estrogens in postmenopausal women may be associated with the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
  • The present study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which low levels of estrogen induce fatty liver disease using an ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model and an in vitro cell model.
  • A total of 24 female C57/BL6 mice were divided into four groups: Sham operation, sham operation plus subcutaneous implantation of tamoxifen (TAM), bilateral OVX, and OVX plus subcutaneous implantation of 17β-estradiol (E2).
  • Marked hepatic steatosis and increased expression of lipogenic genes (acetyl‑CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase) was observed in the estrogen‑depleted mice (TAM and OVX groups), as compared with in the sham operation group.
  • Treatment with E2 significantly improved hepatic steatosis by decreasing the expression of the aforementioned lipogenic genes.
  • Furthermore, hepatic aquaporin 7 (AQP7) expression was decreased in the estrogen‑depleted mice, but was increased in the OVX + E2 treatment group, as compared with in the sham operation group.
  • These results suggested an association between AQP7 and low estrogen‑induced hepatic steatosis.
  • Subsequently, the functions of AQP7 in hepatic steatosis were investigated using an oleic acid‑induced HepG2 cell model of steatosis.
  • Treatment with E2 alleviated lipid accumulation and decreased the expression of lipogenic genes in vitro; however, such effects were attenuated following transfection with AQP7 small interfering RNA.
  • The present study suggested a mechanism by which low levels of estrogen induce fatty liver disease, and may provide useful information regarding the prevention and treatment of fatty liver disease in postmenopausal women.
  • [MeSH-major] Aquaporins / genetics. Estrogens / pharmacology. Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease / etiology. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease / metabolism. Ovariectomy
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Disease Models, Animal. Female. Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic. Hep G2 Cells. Humans. Lipid Metabolism / drug effects. Lipid Metabolism / genetics. Lipogenesis / drug effects. Lipogenesis / genetics. Mice. RNA, Small Interfering / genetics

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  • (PMID = 27176782.001).
  • [ISSN] 1791-3004
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular medicine reports
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol Med Rep
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Greece
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aqp7 protein, mouse; 0 / Aquaporins; 0 / Estrogens; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering
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10. Shu J, Sun G, Liu H, Liu J: Clinical utility of vascular endothelial growth factor in diagnosing malignant pleural effusions. Acta Oncol; 2007;46(7):1004-11
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Clinical utility of vascular endothelial growth factor in diagnosing malignant pleural effusions.
  • While the early diagnosis of cancer has been fully respected, it is still however often difficult for clinicians to confirm malignant pleural effusions (PE), which essentially indicate the end-stage cancer.
  • It has now been demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a pivotal angiogenesis factor and associated with tumor growth and metastasis.
  • The aim of this study was then to assess the diagnostic performance of VEGF in malignant PE.
  • In this controlled and blinded prospective study, 113 consecutive patients with PE were recruited.
  • For each eligible case, the VEGF levels of pleural fluid (PF) and serum were examined simultaneously using enzyme immunoassay.
  • The reference standard for malignant PE was clinical evaluation and PF cytology with pleural biopsy, other examination and follow-up added as needed.
  • According to the final diagnoses, 81 qualified cases were grouped as malignant (n=32) and benign (n=49) PE.
  • For PF VEGF level, the mean in malignant group was higher than that in benign group (1358+/-1493 pg/mL vs. 422+/-317 pg/mL, p=0.001).
  • As did for serum VEGF level (650+/-533 pg/mL vs. 137+/-189 pg/mL, p<0.001).
  • Using receiver operating characteristic analysis, the determined diagnostic cut-off points of VEGF levels of PF and serum for malignant PE were 959.25 pg/mL and 212.36 pg/mL, with sensitivities of 47%, 69% and specificities of 96%, 88%, respectively.
  • For cascade connection and parallel operation of PF VEGF and serum VEGF, the sensitivities were 34%, 81% at specificities of 98%, 86%, respectively.
  • These findings suggest that VEGF could be used in diagnosing malignant PE as a useful adjunct of conventional algorithm.
  • Different VEGF test strategies, including test on PF, serum and both, may be selected according to practical needs.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomarkers, Tumor / analysis. Pleural Effusion, Malignant / diagnosis. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Prognosis. Prospective Studies. Sensitivity and Specificity. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 17917830.001).
  • [ISSN] 0284-186X
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Oncol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Norway
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers, Tumor; 0 / VEGFA protein, human; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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