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Items 1 to 10 of about 292
1. Schulz PJ, Rubinell S, Hartung U: An internet-based approach to enhance self-managementof chronic low back pain in the italian-speaking population of Switzerland: results from a pilot study. Int J Public Health; 2007;52(5):286-94
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An internet-based approach to enhance self-managementof chronic low back pain in the italian-speaking population of Switzerland: results from a pilot study.
  • OBJECTIVE: To illustrate the development and pilot evaluation of a website designed to enhance self-management of chronic low back pain for the Italian-speaking population of Switzerland.
  • METHODS: 20 patients affected by chronic low back pain used a website--specifically created for the project--for a period of five months, under the monitoring of a team of health professionals.
  • Evaluation was carried out by means of a telephone questionnaire administered at baseline and at the end of the intervention, and intermediate online user-testing performed in the fourth month of the intervention.
  • A control group of 15 patients was created to assist the evaluation.
  • RESULTS: Compared to the control group, results from the pilot evaluation suggest a decrease in the intensity of back pain in people with access to the website; an increase in physical activity; a reduction in both medical consultation and the use of painkillers, and a gain in declarative and procedural knowledge.
  • This coincides with a general positive assessment of the website.
  • CONCLUSION: The study supports the need to test the proposed approach on a wider scale.
  • [MeSH-major] Internet. Low Back Pain / rehabilitation. Patient Education as Topic / methods. Self Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Exercise. Follow-Up Studies. Health Behavior. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Health Surveys. Humans. Pain Measurement. Patient Satisfaction. Pilot Projects. Sick Role. Social Support. Software. Switzerland

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  • (PMID = 18030944.001).
  • [ISSN] 1661-8556
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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2. Labrie NH, Ludolph R, Schulz PJ: Investigating young women's motivations to engage in early mammography screening in Switzerland: results of a cross-sectional study. BMC Cancer; 2017 Mar 21;17(1):209
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Investigating young women's motivations to engage in early mammography screening in Switzerland: results of a cross-sectional study.
  • BACKGROUND: The scientific and public debate concerning organized mammography screening is unprecedentedly strong.
  • With research evidence concerning its efficacy being ambiguous, the recommendations pertaining to the age-thresholds for program inclusion vary between - and even within - countries.
  • Data shows that young women who are not yet eligible for systematic screening, have opportunistic mammograms relatively often and, moreover, want to be included in organized programs.
  • Yet, to date, little is known about the precise motivations underlying young women's desire and intentions to go for, not medically indicated, mammographic screening.
  • METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was carried out among women aged 30-49 years (n = 918) from Switzerland.
  • RESULTS: The findings show that high fear (β = .08, p ≤ .05), perceived susceptibility (β = .10, p ≤ .05), and ego-involvement (β = .34, p ≤ .001) are the main predictors of screening intentions among women who are not yet eligible for the systematic program.
  • Also, geographical location (Swiss-French group: β = .15, p ≤ .001; Swiss-Italian group: β = .26, p ≤ .001) and age (β = .11, p ≤ .001) play a role.
  • In turn, breast cancer knowledge, risk perceptions, and educational status do not have a significant impact.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Young women seem to differ inherently from those who are already eligible for systematic screening in terms of the factors underlying their intentions to engage in mammographic screening.
  • Thus, when striving to promote adherence to systematic screening guidelines - whether based on unequivocal scientific evidence or policy decisions - and to allow women to make evidence-based, informed decisions about mammography, differential strategies are needed to reach different age-groups.

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  • (PMID = 28327090.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2407
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Breast cancer / Ego-involvement / Fear / Knowledge / Mammography screening / Risk perceptions / Switzerland / Women aged 30-49
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3. Schulz PJ, Hartung U, Fiordelli M: Effect of smoke-free legislation on Ticino gastronomy revenue. Int J Public Health; 2012 Dec;57(6):861-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of smoke-free legislation on Ticino gastronomy revenue.
  • OBJECTIVE: To provide evidence on the effects of smoke-free laws on gastronomy revenue in a European setting based on objective data.
  • Damage to gastronomy revenue is a widely used argument against smoke-free legislation.
  • METHOD: Gastronomy revenue in Ticino is compared with the rest of Switzerland before and after Ticino banned smoking from gastronomy in April 2007, being the first (and at the time of the study only) Swiss canton to do that.
  • The study uses breakdowns by cantons of taxable revenue of gastronomy branches and retailers (for comparison) provided by the Swiss tax authorities for the years 2005-2008.
  • RESULTS: Revenues of restaurants and bars were not damaged by the Ticino smoke-free law.
  • Decreases in Ticino happened before the smoke-free law came into effect.
  • Evidence for night clubs is inconclusive.
  • DISCUSSION: The absence of detrimental effects on restaurant and bar revenue corroborates the gist of research on the subject from other countries.
  • The argument that the decline of bar and restaurant sales prior to the implementation of the ban might have occurred in anticipation of the new regulation is not considered tenable.
  • [MeSH-major] Commerce / economics. Restaurants / economics. Tobacco Smoke Pollution / legislation & jurisprudence
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Switzerland

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Secondhand Smoke.
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  • (PMID = 22941112.001).
  • [ISSN] 1661-8564
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tobacco Smoke Pollution
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4. Allam A, Schulz PJ, Krauthammer M: Toward automated assessment of health Web page quality using the DISCERN instrument. J Am Med Inform Assoc; 2017 May 01;24(3):481-487
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Toward automated assessment of health Web page quality using the DISCERN instrument.
  • Background: As the Internet becomes the number one destination for obtaining health-related information, there is an increasing need to identify health Web pages that convey an accurate and current view of medical knowledge.
  • In response, the research community has created multicriteria instruments for reliably assessing online medical information quality.
  • One such instrument is DISCERN, which measures health Web page quality by assessing an array of features.
  • In order to scale up use of the instrument, there is interest in automating the quality evaluation process by building machine learning (ML)-based DISCERN Web page classifiers.
  • Objective: The paper addresses 2 key issues that are essential before constructing automated DISCERN classifiers:.
  • (1) generation of a robust DISCERN training corpus useful for training classification algorithms, and (2) assessment of the usefulness of the current DISCERN scoring schema as a metric for evaluating the performance of these algorithms.
  • Methods: Using DISCERN, 272 Web pages discussing treatment options in breast cancer, arthritis, and depression were evaluated and rated by trained coders.
  • First, different consensus models were compared to obtain a robust aggregated rating among the coders, suitable for a DISCERN ML training corpus.
  • Second, a new DISCERN scoring criterion was proposed (features-based score) as an ML performance metric that is more reflective of the score distribution across different DISCERN quality criteria.
  • Results: First, we found that a probabilistic consensus model applied to the DISCERN instrument was robust against noise (random ratings) and superior to other approaches for building a training corpus.
  • Second, we found that the established DISCERN scoring schema (overall score) is ill-suited to measure ML performance for automated classifiers.
  • Conclusion: Use of a probabilistic consensus model is advantageous for building a training corpus for the DISCERN instrument, and use of a features-based score is an appropriate ML metric for automated DISCERN classifiers.
  • Availability: The code for the probabilistic consensus model is available at https://bitbucket.org/A_2/em_dawid/ .
  • [MeSH-major] Algorithms. Consumer Health Information / standards. Internet / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Quality Control

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  • (PMID = 27707819.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-974X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Med Inform Assoc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; DISCERN / consensus model / health information quality / multicriteria instrument
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5. Rothenfluh F, Germeni E, Schulz PJ: Consumer Decision-Making Based on Review Websites: Are There Differences Between Choosing a Hotel and Choosing a Physician? J Med Internet Res; 2016 06 16;18(6):e129
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Consumer Decision-Making Based on Review Websites: Are There Differences Between Choosing a Hotel and Choosing a Physician?
  • BACKGROUND: Web users are increasingly encouraged to rate and review consumer services (eg, hotels, restaurants) and, more recently, this is also the case for physicians and medical services.
  • The resemblance in the setup and design of commercial rating websites (CRWs) and Web-based physician rating websites (PRWs) raises the question of whether choice-making processes based on the two types of websites could also be similar.
  • OBJECTIVE: This qualitative study sought to explore the extent to which consumer decision making based on Web-based reviews is the same for consumer services (ie, choice of a hotel) and health services (ie, choice of a pediatrician), while providing an in-depth understanding of potential differences or similarities.
  • METHODS: Between June and August 2015, we carried out a total of 22 qualitative interviews with young parents residing in the German-speaking part of Switzerland.
  • Participants were invited to complete 2 choice tasks, which involved (1) choosing a hotel based on the commercial Web-based rating website TripAdvisor and (2) selecting a pediatrician based on the PRW Jameda.
  • To better understand consumers' thought processes, we instructed participants to "think aloud", namely to verbalize their thinking while sorting through information and reaching decisions.
  • Using a semistructured interview guide, we subsequently posed open-ended questions to allow them to elaborate more on factors influencing their decision making, level of confidence in their final choice, and perceived differences and similarities in their search for a hotel and a physician.
  • All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive thematic approach.
  • RESULTS: Participants spent on average 9:57 minutes (standard deviation=9:22, minimum=3:46, maximum=22:25) searching for a hotel and 6:17 minutes (standard deviation=4:47, minimum=00:38, maximum=19:25) searching for a pediatrician.
  • Although the choice of a pediatrician was perceived as more important than the choice of a hotel, participants found choosing a physician much easier than selecting an appropriate accommodation.
  • Four main themes emerged from the analysis of our interview data that can explain the differences in search time and choice confidence:.
  • (1) trial and error, (2) trust, (3) competence assessment, and (4) affect and likeability.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that, despite congruent website designs, individuals only trust review information to choose a hotel, but refuse to fully rely on it for selecting a physician.
  • The design and content of Web-based PRWs need to be adjusted to better address the differing information needs of health consumers.
  • [MeSH-major] Choice Behavior. Decision Making. Internet / statistics & numerical data. Physicians / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Housing / standards. Humans. Male. Patient Satisfaction

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  • (PMID = 27311623.001).
  • [ISSN] 1438-8871
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of medical Internet research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Med. Internet Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4929347
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; electronic word of mouth (major topic) / health care provider (major topic) / health care quality assessment (major topic) / patient satisfaction (major topic) / physician choice (major topic) / physician rating website (major topic) / qualitative research (major topic)
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6. Frisch AL, Camerini L, Schulz PJ: The impact of presentation style on the retention of online health information: a randomized-controlled experiment. Health Commun; 2013;28(3):286-93
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The impact of presentation style on the retention of online health information: a randomized-controlled experiment.
  • The Internet plays an increasingly important role in health education, providing laypeople with information about health-related topics that range from disease-specific contexts to general health promotion.
  • Compared to traditional health education, the Internet allows the use of multimedia applications that offer promise to enhance individuals' health knowledge and literacy.
  • This study aims at testing the effect of multimedia presentation of health information on learning.
  • Relying on an experimental design, it investigates how retention of information differs for text-only presentation, image-only presentation, and multimedia (text and image) presentation of online health information.
  • Two hundred and forty students were randomly assigned to four groups each exposed to a different website version.
  • Three groups were exposed to the same information using text only, image only, or text and image presentation.
  • A fourth group received unrelated information (control group).
  • Retention was assessed by the means of a recognition test.
  • To examine a possible interaction between website version and recognition test, half of the students received a recognition test in text form and half of them received a recognition test in imagery form.
  • In line with assumptions from Dual Coding Theory, students exposed to the multimedia (text and image) presentation recognized significantly more information than students exposed to the text-only presentation.
  • This did not hold for students exposed to the image-only presentation.
  • The impact of presentation style on retention scores was moderated by the way retention was assessed for image-only presentation, but not for text-only or multimedia presentation.
  • Possible explanations and implications for the design of online health education interventions are discussed.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Education / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Back Pain / psychology. Female. Humans. Internet / standards. Male. Multimedia / standards. Neck Pain / psychology. Retention (Psychology). Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 22716268.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-7027
  • [Journal-full-title] Health communication
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Health Commun
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] England
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7. Buschini A, Villarini M, Feretti D, Mussi F, Dominici L, Zerbini I, Moretti M, Ceretti E, Bonfiglioli R, Carrieri M, Gelatti U, Rossi C, Monarca S, Poli P: Multicentre study for the evaluation of mutagenic/carcinogenic risk in nurses exposed to antineoplastic drugs: assessment of DNA damage. Occup Environ Med; 2013 Nov;70(11):789-94
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Multicentre study for the evaluation of mutagenic/carcinogenic risk in nurses exposed to antineoplastic drugs: assessment of DNA damage.
  • OBJECTIVES: People who handle antineoplastic drugs, many of which classified as human carcinogens by International Agency for Research on Cancer, are exposed to low doses in comparison with patients; however, the long duration of exposure could lead to health effects.
  • The aim of this work was to evaluate DNA damage in white blood cells from 63 nurses who handle antineoplastic drugs in five Italian hospitals and 74 control participants, using different versions of the Comet assay.
  • METHODS: Primary DNA damage was assessed by using the alkaline version of the assay on leucocytes, whereas to detect DNA oxidative damage and cryptic lesions specifically, the Comet/ENDO III assay and the Comet/araC assay were performed on leucocytes and lymphocytes, respectively.
  • RESULTS: In the present study, no significant DNA damage was correlated with the work shift.
  • The exposed population did not differ significantly from the reference group with respect to DNA primary and oxidative damage in leucocytes.
  • Strikingly, in isolated lymphocytes treated with araC, lower data dispersion as well as a significantly lower mean value for the percentage of DNA in the comet tail was observed in exposed participants as compared with the control group (p<0.05), suggesting a potential chronic exposure to crosslinking antineoplastic drugs.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although stringent rules were adopted at national and international levels to prevent occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, data reported in this study support the idea that a more efficient survey on long-lasting exposures at very low concentrations is needed.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / toxicity. Carcinogens. DNA. DNA Damage. Hospitals. Mutagens. Nurses. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Case-Control Studies. Comet Assay. Cytarabine / pharmacology. Female. Humans. Leukocytes. Lymphocytes. Occupational Diseases / genetics. Oxidative Stress. Risk Assessment. Work

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Health Facilities.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Occupational Health.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. CYTARABINE .
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  • (PMID = 24143019.001).
  • [ISSN] 1470-7926
  • [Journal-full-title] Occupational and environmental medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Occup Environ Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antineoplastic Agents; 0 / Carcinogens; 0 / Mutagens; 04079A1RDZ / Cytarabine; 9007-49-2 / DNA
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Antineoplastic drugs / Comet assay / Occupational exposure
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8. Rubinelli S, Nakamoto K, Schulz PJ: The rabbit in the hat: dubious argumentation and the persuasive effects of prescription drug advertising (DTCA). Commun Med; 2008;5(1):49-58
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The rabbit in the hat: dubious argumentation and the persuasive effects of prescription drug advertising (DTCA).
  • There is an ongoing global debate over the potential benefits and risks of allowing direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription medicines (DTCA).
  • The core of this debate concerns the identification of DTCA either as a beneficial procedure to be promoted or as a damaging procedure to be abolished.
  • Economic data on DTCA suggest that this form of advertising has an impact on consumers.
  • Based on this premise, we explore the use of argumentation theory to inquire into the reasons for this success.
  • In particular, by combining perspectives from argumentation theory and marketing research this paper aims to test the hypothesis of whether DTCA presents information framed in potentially misleading, but persuasive, argumentative structures.
  • We highlight and discuss the results of two studies designed to assess whether readers perceive DTCA as argumentative and, if so, which explicit and implicit elements provide groundings for the inference that consumers draw from the ads.
  • The analysis highlights the presence in DTCA of dubious arguments (fallacies and distracting claims) that may go unnoticed.
  • Also, it illustrates the nature of readers' wrong assumptions that arise independently from the contents of the ads.
  • These factors seem to influence the level of the self-perceived persuasiveness of DTCA.
  • [MeSH-major] Advertising as Topic. Drug Industry. Drug Prescriptions
  • [MeSH-minor] Communication. Humans

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  • (PMID = 19363879.001).
  • [ISSN] 1612-1783
  • [Journal-full-title] Communication & medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Commun Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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9. Covolo L, Gelatti U, Talamini R, Garte S, Trevisi P, Franceschi S, Franceschini M, Barbone F, Tagger A, Ribero ML, Parrinello G, Donadon V, Nardi G, Donato F: Alcohol dehydrogenase 3, glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 polymorphisms, alcohol consumption and hepatocellular carcinoma (Italy). Cancer Causes Control; 2005 Sep;16(7):831-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Alcohol dehydrogenase 3, glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 polymorphisms, alcohol consumption and hepatocellular carcinoma (Italy).
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of alcohol dehydrogenase type 3 (ADH3), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) polymorphisms in modifying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk according to alcohol intake.
  • METHODS: A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in two areas of North Italy.
  • Two-hundred cases hospitalized for HCC and 400 controls were recruited.
  • Genotypes were determined using PCR and the PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism-based method.
  • RESULTS: There was no association of the putative risk genotypes ADH3(1-1), GSTM1 null and GSTT1 null with HCC (odds ratio [OR], 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5-1.3; OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.6-1.5; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.4-1.4, respectively).
  • A steady increase in HCC risk with increasing alcohol intake, which did not vary according to ADH3 and GSTT1 genotypes, was observed.
  • Nevertheless, the OR for HCC due to an alcohol intake of >100 g of ethanol per day increased in subjects with GSTM1 null genotype (OR, 8.5; 95% CI, 3.9-18.6) compared to GSTM1 non-null genotype (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.0-10.0).
  • CONCLUSIONS: ADH3(1-1) and GSTT1 null genotypes did not modify the risk of HCC due to alcohol intake whereas an influence of GSTM1 null genotype for high ethanol consumption was suggested.
  • [MeSH-major] Alcohol Drinking / adverse effects. Aldehyde Oxidoreductases / genetics. Carcinoma, Hepatocellular / genetics. Glutathione Transferase / genetics. Liver Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Case-Control Studies. Female. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Genotype. Humans. Italy. Male. Middle Aged. Polymerase Chain Reaction. Polymorphism, Genetic. Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length. Risk Factors

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  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Liver Cancer.
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  • (PMID = 16132793.001).
  • [ISSN] 0957-5243
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer causes & control : CCC
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Causes Control
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 1.1.1.284 / formaldehyde dehydrogenase (glutathione); EC 1.2.- / Aldehyde Oxidoreductases; EC 2.5.1.- / glutathione S-transferase T1; EC 2.5.1.18 / Glutathione Transferase; EC 2.5.1.18 / glutathione S-transferase M1
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10. Merla A, Mattei PA, Di Donato L, Romani GL: Thermal imaging of cutaneous temperature modifications in runners during graded exercise. Ann Biomed Eng; 2010 Jan;38(1):158-63
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Thermal imaging of cutaneous temperature modifications in runners during graded exercise.
  • In this paper we used high-resolution thermal imaging to visualize the human whole body anterior cutaneous temperature (T(c)) variations in well-trained runners during graded exercise.
  • Fifteen male volunteers underwent a graded treadmill test until reaching their individual maximal heart rate.
  • Total body T(c) decreased as the subjects started the exercise.
  • Thighs and forearms exhibited the earliest response.
  • A further T(c) diminution occurred with the progress of the exercise.
  • At the exercise interruption, T(c) values were in average 3-5 degrees C lower than at baseline.
  • T(c) increased during recovery from exercise.
  • Forearms and thighs exhibited the earliest increase, followed by total body T(c) increase.
  • Thermal imaging documented the presence of hyperthermal spots (occasionally tree-shaped) due to the presence of muscle perforator vessels during baseline and recovery, but not during exercise.
  • The results we report indicate that thermal infrared imaging permits the quantitative evaluation of specific cutaneous whole body thermal adaptations which occur during and after graded physical activity.
  • Thus providing the basis for evaluating local and systemic cutaneous blood flow adaptation as a function of specific type, intensity and duration of exercise, and helping to determine the ideal conditions (in terms of environment and apparel) in which physical activities should be conducted in order to favor thermal regulatory processes.
  • [MeSH-major] Body Temperature / physiology. Exercise / physiology. Imaging, Three-Dimensional / methods. Running / physiology. Thermography / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Infrared Rays. Male

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  • (PMID = 19798579.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-9686
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of biomedical engineering
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Biomed Eng
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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