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Items 1 to 10 of about 1062
1. Werwitzke S, Geisen U, Nowak-Göttl U, Eichler H, Stephan B, Scholz U, Holstein K, Klamroth R, Knöbl P, Huth-Kühne A, Bomke B, Tiede A: Diagnostic and prognostic value of factor VIII binding antibodies in acquired hemophilia A: data from the GTH-AH 01/2010 study. J Thromb Haemost; 2016 May;14(5):940-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Diagnostic and prognostic value of factor VIII binding antibodies in acquired hemophilia A: data from the GTH-AH 01/2010 study.
  • Essentials Factor VIII (FVIII) binding IgG detected by ELISA could be an alternative to the Bethesda assay.
  • We studied the performance of anti-FVIII IgG ELISA in patients with acquired hemophilia and controls.
  • Anti-FVIII IgG > 99th percentile of controls was highly sensitive and specific.
  • Patients with high anti-FVIII IgG have a lower chance of achieving remission.
  • SUMMARY: Background Acquired hemophilia A is a severe bleeding disorder that requires fast and accurate diagnosis as it occurs often unexpectedly in previously healthy men and women of every age.
  • The Nijmegen-modified Bethesda assay is the diagnostic reference standard for detecting neutralizing autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII), but is not widely available, not ideal for quantifying the complex type 2 inhibitors seen in acquired hemophilia, and suffers from high inter-laboratory variability.
  • Objectives To assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of FVIII-binding antibodies as detected by ELISA compared with the Nijmegen Bethesda assay.
  • Methods Samples from the time of first diagnosis and clinical data were available from 102 patients with acquired hemophilia enrolled in the prospective GTH-AH 01/2010 study.
  • Controls (n = 102) were matched for gender and age.
  • Diagnostic cut-offs were determined by receiver-operator curve analysis.
  • The prognostic value was assessed in 92 of the 102 patients by Cox regression analysis of time to partial remission.
  • Results Anti-FVIII IgG above the 99th percentile (> 15 arbitrary units per mL) revealed high sensitivity and specificity (both 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.0) for diagnosing acquired hemophilia.
  • The likelihood of achieving partial remission was related to anti-FVIII IgG concentration (< 300 arbitrary units, 1.0; 300-1050, 0.65; > 1050, 0.39).
  • The Bethesda titer was only associated with the likelihood of partial remission when analyzed in the central laboratory, but not when data from local GTH study sites were used.
  • Conclusion Although the Nijmegen-modified Bethesda assay is the reference standard for demonstrating neutralizing antibodies, the detection of FVIII-binding antibodies by ELISA is similarly sensitive and specific for diagnosing acquired hemophilia.
  • In addition, anti-FVIII IgG may provide prognostic information.

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  • [Copyright] © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.
  • (PMID = 26988717.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-7836
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Thromb. Haemost.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ELISA / antibodies / factor VIII / hemophilia A, acquired / inhibitors
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2. Amrein MA, Rackow P, Inauen J, Radtke T, Scholz U: The role of Compensatory Health Beliefs in eating behavior change: A mixed method study. Appetite; 2017 Sep 01;116:1-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The role of Compensatory Health Beliefs in eating behavior change: A mixed method study.
  • Compensatory Health Beliefs (CHBs), defined as beliefs that an unhealthy behavior can be compensated for by engaging in another healthy behavior, are assumed to hinder health behavior change.
  • The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of CHBs for two distinct eating behaviors (increased fruit and vegetable consumption and eating fewer unhealthy snacks) with a mixed method approach.
  • Participants (N = 232, mean age = 27.3 years, 76.3% women) were randomly assigned to a fruit and vegetable or an unhealthy snack condition.
  • For the quantitative approach, path models were fitted to analyze the role of CHBs within a social-cognitive theory of health behavior change, the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA).
  • With a content analysis, the qualitative approach investigated the occurrence of CHBs in smartphone chat groups when pursuing an eating goal.
  • Both analyses were conducted for each eating behavior separately.
  • Path models showed that CHBs added predictive value for intention, but not behavior over and above HAPA variables only in the unhealthy snack condition.
  • CHBs were significantly negatively associated with intention and action planning.
  • Content analysis revealed that people generated only a few CHB messages.
  • However, CHBs were more likely to be present and were also more diverse in the unhealthy snack condition compared to the fruit and vegetable condition.
  • Based on a mixed method approach, this study suggests that CHBs play a more important role for eating unhealthy snacks than for fruit and vegetable consumption.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28433774.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-8304
  • [Journal-full-title] Appetite
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appetite
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Compensatory Health Beliefs / Fruit and vegetable consumption / Health Action Process Approach / Smartphone chat groups / Unhealthy snacks
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3. Smul TM, Stumpner J, Blomeyer C, Lotz C, Redel A, Lange M, Roewer N, Kehl F: Propofol inhibits desflurane-induced preconditioning in rabbits. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth; 2011 Apr;25(2):276-81
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  • [Title] Propofol inhibits desflurane-induced preconditioning in rabbits.
  • OBJECTIVES: The authors tested the hypothesis that ischemic and desflurane-induced preconditioning are blocked by propofol.
  • DESIGN: A prospective, randomized, vehicle-controlled study.
  • SETTING: A university research laboratory.
  • SUBJECTS: New Zealand white rabbits (n = 52).
  • METHODS: Pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits were subjected to 30 minutes of coronary artery occlusion followed by 3 hours of reperfusion.
  • Rabbits received 0.0 (control) or 1.0 minimum alveolar concentration of desflurane (30 minutes' duration and a 30-minute memory period) or ischemic preconditioning (5 minutes of ischemia and a 30-minute memory period) in the absence or presence of propofol (10 mg/kg/h intravenously) or its vehicle (10% Intralipid emulsion; B Braun, Melsungen, Germany).
  • The myocardial infarct size was measured with triphenyltetrazolium staining.
  • Statistical analysis was performed with 1-way and 2-way analysis of variance when appropriate, followed by a post hoc Duncan test.
  • Data are mean ± standard deviation.
  • RESULTS: Myocardial infarct size was 56% ± 8% in control animals (n = 7).
  • Desflurane significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the infarct size to 37% ± 6% (n = 7).
  • Desflurane-induced preconditioning was blocked by propofol (65% ± 10%, n = 7) but not by its vehicle (45% ± 11%, n = 5).
  • Propofol and its vehicle alone had no effect on the infarct size (62% ± 8% [n = 6] and 58% ± 3% [n=5], respectively).
  • Ischemic preconditioning reduced infarct size in the absence or presence of propofol to 24% ± 7% (n = 7) and 29% ± 12% (n = 6).
  • CONCLUSION: Desflurane-induced preconditioning markedly reduced infarct size and was blocked by propofol, whereas ischemic preconditioning was not blocked by propofol.
  • The results suggest an important interference between propofol and anesthetic-induced preconditioning and might explain some contradictory findings in studies in humans.
  • [MeSH-major] Ischemic Preconditioning, Myocardial / methods. Isoflurane / analogs & derivatives. Propofol / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Male. Myocardial Infarction / drug therapy. Myocardial Infarction / pathology. Prospective Studies. Rabbits. Random Allocation

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. PROPOFOL .
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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20947380.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-8422
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Cardiothorac. Vasc. Anesth.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] CRS35BZ94Q / desflurane; CYS9AKD70P / Isoflurane; YI7VU623SF / Propofol
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4. Birnbaum J, Flemming S, Reichard N, Soares AB, Mesén-Ramírez P, Jonscher E, Bergmann B, Spielmann T: A genetic system to study Plasmodium falciparum protein function. Nat Methods; 2017 Apr;14(4):450-456
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A genetic system to study Plasmodium falciparum protein function.
  • Current systems to study essential genes in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are often inefficient and time intensive, and they depend on the genetic modification of the target locus, a process hindered by the low frequency of integration of episomal DNA into the genome.
  • Here, we introduce a method, termed selection-linked integration (SLI), to rapidly select for genomic integration.
  • SLI allowed us to functionally analyze targets at the gene and protein levels, thus permitting mislocalization of native proteins, a strategy known as knock sideways, floxing to induce diCre-based excision of genes and knocking in altered gene copies.
  • We demonstrated the power and robustness of this approach by validating it for more than 12 targets, including eight essential ones.
  • We also localized and inducibly inactivated Kelch13, the protein associated with artemisinin resistance.
  • We expect this system to be widely applicable for P. falciparum and other organisms with limited genetic tractability.
  • [MeSH-major] Genetic Techniques. Plasmodium falciparum / genetics. Protozoan Proteins / genetics. Protozoan Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Artemisinins / pharmacology. Drug Resistance / drug effects. Drug Resistance / genetics. Genetic Complementation Test. Recombinant Proteins / genetics. Recombinant Proteins / metabolism. rab5 GTP-Binding Proteins / genetics. rab5 GTP-Binding Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 28288121.001).
  • [ISSN] 1548-7105
  • [Journal-full-title] Nature methods
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nat. Methods
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Artemisinins; 0 / Protozoan Proteins; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 9RMU91N5K2 / artemisinine; EC 3.6.5.2 / rab5 GTP-Binding Proteins
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5. Berli C, Bolger N, Shrout PE, Stadler G, Scholz U: Interpersonal Processes of Couples' Daily Support for Goal Pursuit: The Example of Physical Activity. Pers Soc Psychol Bull; 2017 Nov 01;:146167217739264
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Interpersonal Processes of Couples' Daily Support for Goal Pursuit: The Example of Physical Activity.
  • Little is known about how couples' social support facilitates the pursuit of important goals in daily life.
  • Using an interpersonal perspective, we examined the effects of support provision and receipt on same-day physical activity, and studied the role of partners' joint engagement in activities.
  • One hundred nineteen heterosexual couples reported on target persons' received and partners' provided support across 28 diary days, yielding 2,854 valid days.
  • A dyadic report on couples' joint engagement was obtained from a subset of 88 couples.
  • Target persons' daily activity was objectively assessed via accelerometers.
  • On days with high versus low levels of provided support, target persons' activity was 25 min higher.
  • Support receipt mediated 20% of this effect.
  • Joint engagement accounted for around half of the effects of provided and received support.
  • Support provision is uniquely linked to goal implementation in everyday life.
  • Joint engagement in activities may be one explanation for how support is facilitated.

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  • (PMID = 29121824.001).
  • [ISSN] 1552-7433
  • [Journal-full-title] Personality & social psychology bulletin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pers Soc Psychol Bull
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; daily diary / goal pursuit / physical activity / romantic relationships / social support
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6. Berli C, Stadler G, Shrout PE, Bolger N, Scholz U: Mediators of Physical Activity Adherence: Results from an Action Control Intervention in Couples. Ann Behav Med; 2017 Jul 14;
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mediators of Physical Activity Adherence: Results from an Action Control Intervention in Couples.
  • BACKGROUND: Behavior change interventions targeting self-regulation skills have generally shown promising effects.
  • However, the psychological working mechanisms remain poorly understood.
  • PURPOSE: We examined theory-based mediators of a randomized controlled trial in couples targeting action control (i.e., continuously monitoring and evaluating an ongoing behavior).
  • Self-reported action control was tested as the main mediating mechanism of physical activity adherence, and in addition self-efficacy and received social support from the partner.
  • METHODS: Overweight individuals (N = 121) and their heterosexual partners were randomly allocated to an intervention (information + action control text messages) or a control group (information only).
  • Across a period of 28 days, participants reported on action control, self-efficacy, and received support in end-of-day diaries, and wore triaxial accelerometers to assess stable between-person differences in mediators and the outcome adherence to recommended daily activity levels (≥30 min of moderate activity in bouts of at least 10 min).
  • RESULTS: On average, participants in the intervention group showed higher physical activity adherence levels and higher action control, self-efficacy, and received support compared to participants in the control group.
  • Action control and received support emerged as mediating mechanisms, explaining 19.7 and 24.6% of the total intervention effect, respectively, in separate analyses, and 13.9 and 22.2% when analyzed simultaneously.
  • No evidence emerged for self-efficacy as mediator.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Action control and received support partly explain the effects of an action control intervention on physical activity adherence levels.
  • Continued research is needed to better understand what drives intervention effects to guide innovative and effective health promotion.
  • TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ( controlled-trials.com ISRCTN15705531).

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  • (PMID = 28710666.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-4796
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Behav Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Action control / Couples / Mediation / Physical activity / Randomized controlled trial / Self-efficacy / Social support
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7. Klingner CM, Huonker R, Flemming S, Hasler C, Brodoehl S, Preul C, Burmeister H, Kastrup A, Witte OW: Functional deactivations: multiple ipsilateral brain areas engaged in the processing of somatosensory information. Hum Brain Mapp; 2011 Jan;32(1):127-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Functional deactivations: multiple ipsilateral brain areas engaged in the processing of somatosensory information.
  • Somatosensory signals modulate activity throughout a widespread network in both of the brain hemispheres: the contralateral as well as the ipsilateral side of the brain relative to the stimulated limb.
  • To analyze the ipsilateral somatosensory brain areas that are engaged during limb stimulation, we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 12 healthy subjects during electrical median nerve stimulation using both a block- and an event-related fMRI design.
  • Data were analyzed through the use of model-dependent (SPM) and model-independent (ICA) approaches.
  • Beyond the well-known positive blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses, negative deflections of the BOLD response were found consistently in several ipsilateral brain areas, including the primary somatosensory cortex, the supplementary motor area, the insula, the dorsal part of the posterior cingulate cortex, and the contralateral cerebellum.
  • Compared to their positive counterparts, the negative hemodynamic responses showed a different time course, with an onset time delay of 2.4 s and a peak delay of 0.7 s.
  • This characteristic delay was observed in all investigated areas and verified by a second (purely tactile) event-related paradigm, suggesting a systematic difference for brain areas involved in the processing of somatosensory information.
  • These findings may indicate that the physiological basis of these deactivations differs from that of the positive BOLD responses.
  • Therefore, an altered model for the negative BOLD response may be beneficial to further model-dependent fMRI analyses.
  • [MeSH-major] Cerebellum / physiology. Functional Laterality / physiology. Motor Cortex / physiology. Somatosensory Cortex / physiology. Touch Perception / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Brain Mapping. Electric Stimulation. Female. Humans. Image Processing, Computer-Assisted. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Median Nerve / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • (PMID = 21157879.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-0193
  • [Journal-full-title] Human brain mapping
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hum Brain Mapp
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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8. Flemming S, Schlegel N, Wunder C, Meir M, Baar W, Wollborn J, Roewer N, Germer CT, Schick MA: Phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition dose dependently stabilizes microvascular barrier functions and microcirculation in a rodent model of polymicrobial sepsis. Shock; 2014 Jun;41(6):537-45
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition dose dependently stabilizes microvascular barrier functions and microcirculation in a rodent model of polymicrobial sepsis.
  • BACKGROUND: Breakdown of microvascular endothelial barrier functions contributes to disturbed microcirculation, organ failure, and death in sepsis.
  • Increased endothelial cAMP levels by systemic application of phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors (PD-4-I) have previously been demonstrated to protect microvascular barrier properties in a model of systemic inflammation (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) suggesting a novel therapeutic option to overcome this problem.
  • However, in a clinically relevant model of polymicrobial sepsis long-term effects, immunomodulatory effects and effectivity of PD-4-I to stabilize microvascular barrier functions and microcirculation remained unexplored.
  • METHODS: We induced polymicrobial sepsis using the colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP) model in which we performed macrohemodynamic and microhemodynamic monitoring with and without systemic intravenous application of different doses of PD-4-I rolipram in Sprague-Dawley rats over 26 h.
  • RESULTS: All animals with CASP showed clinical and laboratory signs of sepsis and peritonitis.
  • Whereas macrohemodynamic adverse effects were not evident, application of PD-4-I led to stabilization of endothelial barrier properties as revealed by reduced extravasation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-albumin.
  • However, only low-dose application of 1 mg/kg body weight per hour of PD-4-I improved microcirculatory flow in the CASP model, whereas high-dose therapy of 3 mg/kg BW per hour PDI-4-I had adverse effects.
  • Accordingly, sepsis-induced acute kidney injury and lung edema were prevented by PD-4-I treatment.
  • Furthermore, PD-4-I showed immunomodulatory effects as revealed by decreased interleukin 1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor α levels following PD-4-I treatment, which appeared not to correlate with barrier-stabilizing effects of rolipram.
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data provide further evidence that systemic application of PD-4-I could be suitable for therapeutic microvascular barrier stabilization and improvement of microcirculatory flow in sepsis.
  • [MeSH-major] Coinfection / drug therapy. Disease Models, Animal. Endothelium / drug effects. Microcirculation / drug effects. Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors / pharmacology. Rolipram / pharmacology. Sepsis / physiopathology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Hemodynamics. Male. Rats. Rats, Sprague-Dawley

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  • (PMID = 24569506.001).
  • [ISSN] 1540-0514
  • [Journal-full-title] Shock (Augusta, Ga.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Shock
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors; K676NL63N7 / Rolipram
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9. Scholz U, Klaghofer R, Dux R, Roellin M, Boehler A, Muellhaupt B, Noll G, Wüthrich RP, Goetzmann L: Predicting intentions and adherence behavior in the context of organ transplantation: gender differences of provided social support. J Psychosom Res; 2012 Mar;72(3):214-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Predicting intentions and adherence behavior in the context of organ transplantation: gender differences of provided social support.
  • OBJECTIVES: Medication non-adherence is a common problem in organ transplantation patients with severe consequences for the patients' health.
  • This study aimed at examining the determinants of intention formation and adherence behavior based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB).
  • Moreover, to account for the role of patients' partners, provided social support by partners was included.
  • Here, support provided by female partners was hypothesized to be more effective than support provided by male partners.
  • METHOD: This cross-sectional study comprised 121 heart, liver, lung, and kidney transplant recipients (n=81 men; mean age=54.32, SD=13.32) and their partners (mean age=51.99, SD=13.67).
  • Patients completed a questionnaire with TPB variables and a validated measure of self-reported adherence.
  • Partners reported their provided social support with regard to medication adherence of the patients.
  • RESULTS: For the prediction of intention to adhere to medication, the non-significant main effect of provided social support was qualified by partners' gender: Support provided by women was positively related to patients' intention to adhere, whereas support provided by men was slightly negatively related to the intention to adhere in their female spouses.
  • Intentions in turn emerged together with relationship quality as the most important predictor of adherence behavior.
  • CONCLUSION: The beneficial effects of support provided by women could be replicated within the framework of the TPB in the context of organ transplantation.
  • Interventions should focus on increasing the effectiveness of support provision of male partners and on promoting relationship quality.
  • [MeSH-major] Intention. Medication Adherence / psychology. Organ Transplantation / psychology. Postoperative Care / psychology. Social Support
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Femininity. Humans. Interpersonal Relations. Male. Medication Therapy Management. Middle Aged. Predictive Value of Tests. Psychological Tests. Psychological Theory. Sex Factors. Spouses / psychology. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 22325701.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1360
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of psychosomatic research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Psychosom Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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10. Lange M, Cox RA, Traber DL, Hamahata A, Nakano Y, Traber LD, Enkhbaatar P: No correlation between initial arterial carboxyhemoglobin level and degree of lung injury following ovine burn and smoke inhalation. Exp Lung Res; 2014 Apr;40(3):99-104
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] No correlation between initial arterial carboxyhemoglobin level and degree of lung injury following ovine burn and smoke inhalation.
  • Fire victims often suffer from burn injury and concomitant inhalation trauma, the latter significantly contributing to the morbidity and mortality in these patients.
  • Measurement of blood carboxyhemoglobin levels has been proposed as a diagnostic marker to verify and, perhaps, quantify the degree of lung injury following inhalation trauma.
  • However, this correlation has not yet been sufficiently validated.
  • A total of 77 chronically instrumented sheep received sham injury, smoke inhalation injury, or combined burn and inhalation trauma following an established protocol.
  • Arterial carboxyhemoglobin concentrations were determined directly after injury and correlated to several clinical and histopathological determinants of lung injury that were detected 48 hours post-injury.
  • The injury induced severe impairment of pulmonary gas exchange and increases in transvascular fluid flux, lung water content, and airway obstruction scores.
  • No significant correlations were detected between initial carboxyhemoglobin levels and all measured clinical and histopathological determinants of lung injury.
  • In conclusion, the amount of arterial carboxyhemoglobin concentration cannot predict the degree of lung injury at 48 hours after ovine burn and smoke inhalation trauma.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Lung Injury / blood. Carboxyhemoglobin / metabolism. Lung / pathology. Smoke Inhalation Injury / blood
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Female. Sheep

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  • (PMID = 24354493.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-0499
  • [Journal-full-title] Experimental lung research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Exp. Lung Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 9061-29-4 / Carboxyhemoglobin
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