Refine your query (more in Advanced-Search):
 Focus on the recent 5 years   Focus on the current year   Focus on the last 30 days   More choices ...
 Focus on articles with free fulltexts   More choices ...
 Do simple 'keyword' search (no query expansion)

[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 10 of about 744
1. Foot B, Foy R, Chakravarthy U, Wormald R: Introduction of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: tracking a moving target. Eye (Lond); 2003 Jul;17(5):583-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Introduction of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: tracking a moving target.
  • OBJECTIVES: To identify changes in referral and treatment patterns of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with photodynamic therapy (PDT) within ophthalmology units in NHS hospitals and assess how beliefs about what would constitute a worthwhile level of clinical benefit had altered over a 12-month period.
  • METHODS: Two questionnaire surveys (October 2000 and October 2001) to all clinical directors or lead consultants in UK NHS eye units.
  • These sought data on which (if any) patients were referred or treated with PDT and the threshold of clinical benefit, in terms of numbers needed to treat, at which they would support the use of PDT.
  • RESULTS: Response rates were 82% in the first survey and 79% in the second.
  • The availability of PDT had significantly increased (P=0.0001).
  • The proportion of units routinely providing PDT for patients with more than 50% classic subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) increased from 8 to 23%.
  • Between the 2 surveys, there was a significant reduction in the threshold of effectiveness at which respondents would support the use of PDT (P=0.012).
  • The proportion of respondents requiring further evidence before supporting the use of PDT decreased from 33 to 17% (P=0.009).
  • There was a significant association between the threshold of support and the level of service provision for both surveys (P=0.01).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Although substantial variations exist, availability of PDT has increased over the 12-month period.
  • The differing thresholds at which introduction of PDT would be considered justifiable varied widely.
  • PDT is being introduced into the NHS in a fragmented manner.
  • In common with other new health technologies, factors other than the strength of evidence appear to be influencing beliefs about the effectiveness of PDT and its subsequent provision.
  • While it is unlikely that such an action alone will lead to evidence-based practice, the variations in beliefs identified by this survey suggest that sufficient clinical uncertainty exists to support the need for further clinical trials.
  • [MeSH-major] Macular Degeneration / drug therapy. Photochemotherapy / utilization
  • [MeSH-minor] Follow-Up Studies. Health Care Surveys. Humans. Medical Staff, Hospital / psychology. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Referral and Consultation. Surveys and Questionnaires


2. Paige NM, Miake-Lye IM, Booth MS, Beroes JM, Mardian AS, Dougherty P, Branson R, Tang B, Morton SC, Shekelle PG: Association of Spinal Manipulative Therapy With Clinical Benefit and Harm for Acute Low Back Pain: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA; 2017 Apr 11;317(14):1451-1460
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association of Spinal Manipulative Therapy With Clinical Benefit and Harm for Acute Low Back Pain: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.
  • Importance: Acute low back pain is common and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is a treatment option.
  • Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses have reported different conclusions about the effectiveness of SMT.
  • Objective: To systematically review studies of the effectiveness and harms of SMT for acute (≤6 weeks) low back pain.
  • Data Sources: Search of MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, and Current Nursing and Allied Health Literature from January 1, 2011, through February 6, 2017, as well as identified systematic reviews and RCTs, for RCTs of adults with low back pain treated in ambulatory settings with SMT compared with sham or alternative treatments, and that measured pain or function outcomes for up to 6 weeks.
  • Observational studies were included to assess harms.
  • Data Extraction and Synthesis: Data extraction was done in duplicate.
  • Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Back and Neck (CBN) Risk of Bias tool.
  • This tool has 11 items in the following domains: randomization, concealment, baseline differences, blinding (patient), blinding (care provider [care provider is a specific quality metric used by the CBN Risk of Bias tool]), blinding (outcome), co-interventions, compliance, dropouts, timing, and intention to treat.
  • Prior research has shown the CBN Risk of Bias tool identifies studies at an increased risk of bias using a threshold of 5 or 6 as a summary score.
  • The evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria.
  • Main Outcomes and Measures: Pain (measured by either the 100-mm visual analog scale, 11-point numeric rating scale, or other numeric pain scale), function (measured by the 24-point Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire or Oswestry Disability Index [range, 0-100]), or any harms measured within 6 weeks.
  • Findings: Of 26 eligible RCTs identified, 15 RCTs (1711 patients) provided moderate-quality evidence that SMT has a statistically significant association with improvements in pain (pooled mean improvement in the 100-mm visual analog pain scale, -9.95 [95% CI, -15.6 to -4.3]).
  • Twelve RCTs (1381 patients) produced moderate-quality evidence that SMT has a statistically significant association with improvements in function (pooled mean effect size, -0.39 [95% CI, -0.71 to -0.07]).
  • Heterogeneity was not explained by type of clinician performing SMT, type of manipulation, study quality, or whether SMT was given alone or as part of a package of therapies.
  • No RCT reported any serious adverse event.
  • Minor transient adverse events such as increased pain, muscle stiffness, and headache were reported 50% to 67% of the time in large case series of patients treated with SMT.
  • Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with acute low back pain, spinal manipulative therapy was associated with modest improvements in pain and function at up to 6 weeks, with transient minor musculoskeletal harms.
  • However, heterogeneity in study results was large.
  • [MeSH-major] Acute Pain / therapy. Low Back Pain / therapy. Manipulation, Spinal / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Observational Studies as Topic. Pain Measurement. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Recovery of Function

  • Faculty of 1000. commentaries/discussion - See the articles recommended by F1000Prime's Faculty of more than 8,000 leading experts in Biology and Medicine. (subscription/membership/fee required).
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] JAMA. 2017 Apr 11;317(14 ):1418-1419 [28399236.001]
  • [ErratumIn] JAMA. 2017 Jun 6;317(21):2239 [28586870.001]
  • [Cites] J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2004 Jul-Aug;27(6):388-98 [15319761.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Public Health. 1998 May;88(5):771-6 [9585743.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1996 Feb 1;21(3):345-55 [8742212.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Spine J. 1998;7(6):461-70 [9883955.001]
  • [Cites] Med J Aust. 1982 Feb 20;1(4):160-4 [6210835.001]
  • [Cites] Percept Mot Skills. 2009 Feb;108(1):196-208 [19425461.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 2015 Oct 13;314(14):1459-67 [26461996.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1994 Mar 1;19(5):569-77 [8184352.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1998 Sep 1;23(17):1875-83; discussion 1884 [9762745.001]
  • [Cites] Phys Ther. 1993 Apr;73(4):216-22; discussion 223-8 [8456141.001]
  • [Cites] Spine J. 2006 Mar-Apr;6(2):131-7 [16517383.001]
  • [Cites] Biometrics. 1994 Dec;50(4):1088-101 [7786990.001]
  • [Cites] J R Soc Med. 2000 May;93(5):258-9 [10884771.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1997 Feb 15;22(4):435-40; discussion 440-1 [9055373.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1987 Sep;12(7):702-6 [2961085.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 Apr 1;38(7):540-8 [23026869.001]
  • [Cites] Scand J Prim Health Care. 1992 Sep;10(3):170-8 [1410946.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Spine J. 1994;3(5):246-54 [7866845.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1984 Apr;9(3):301-4 [6233718.001]
  • [Cites] J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2004 Mar-Apr;27(3):197-210 [15129202.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2009 Dec 1;34(25):2720-9 [19940729.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Sep;68(9):1420-7 [18775942.001]
  • [Cites] BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014 Feb 18;14:25 [24548571.001]
  • [Cites] J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2004 Sep;27(7):431-41 [15389174.001]
  • [Cites] N Z Med J. 1985 May 22;98(779):372-5 [3157894.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Rheumatol. 1987 Dec;26(6):416-23 [2961394.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2007 Nov 10;370(9599):1638-43 [17993364.001]
  • [Cites] J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2008 Feb;31(2):94-103 [18328935.001]
  • [Cites] BMJ. 2003 Sep 6;327(7414):557-60 [12958120.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 Sep 15;38(20):1723-9 [23778372.001]
  • [Cites] J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2015 Nov-Dec;38(9):677-91 [23787298.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2009 Jul 15;34(16):1685-92 [19770609.001]
  • [Cites] BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2014 Mar 12;15:77 [24618345.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2009 May 1;34(10):1078-93 [19363456.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Ind Med. 1974 Jan;31(1):59-64 [4274488.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1990 May;15(5):364-70 [2141951.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Intern Med. 2015 Sep 1;163(5):373-81 [26302454.001]
  • [Cites] BMJ. 2015 Mar 31;350:h1225 [25828856.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Intern Med. 2003 Jun 3;138(11):871-81 [12779297.001]
  • [Cites] Phys Ther. 1994 Dec;74(12):1093-100 [7991650.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2008 Jul 15;33(16):1766-74 [18580547.001]
  • [Cites] J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1997 Oct;20(8):511-5 [9345679.001]
  • [Cites] Man Ther. 2004 Aug;9(3):151-6 [15245709.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 Apr 15;38(8):627-34 [23060056.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Orthop Scand. 1977;(170):1-117 [146394.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Dec 15;27(24):2835-43 [12486357.001]
  • [Cites] J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1993 Jan;16(1):7-13 [8423429.001]
  • [Cites] Psychol Methods. 2008 Mar;13(1):31-48 [18331152.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Rehabil. 2011 Nov;25(11):999-1010 [21831926.001]
  • [Cites] Man Ther. 2015 Apr;20(2):335-41 [25454683.001]
  • [Cites] Scand J Prim Health Care. 1993 Jun;11(2):83-90 [8356370.001]
  • [Cites] BMJ. 1997 Sep 13;315(7109):629-34 [9310563.001]
  • [Cites] J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2003 Nov-Dec;26(9):593-601 [14673408.001]
  • [Cites] Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Sep 12;(9):CD008880 [22972127.001]
  • [Cites] J Man Manip Ther. 2012 Feb;20(1):5-15 [23372389.001]
  • [Cites] Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Apr 14;(4):CD005427 [20393942.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2001 Feb 1;344(5):363-70 [11172169.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1998 Oct 8;339(15):1021-9 [9761803.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Rehabil. 2008 Jun;22(6):529-41 [18511533.001]
  • [Cites] Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2006 Mar 15;31(6):623-31 [16540864.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Intern Med. 2004 Dec 21;141(12):920-8 [15611489.001]
  • [Cites] Scand J Prim Health Care. 1992 Dec;10(4):310-5 [1480873.001]
  • [CommentIn] Praxis (Bern 1994). 2017 Aug;106(16):895-896 [28795625.001]
  • [CommentIn] JAMA. 2017 Sep 5;318(9):865-866 [28873153.001]
  • [ErratumIn] JAMA. 2017 Nov 28;318(20):2048 [29183047.001]
  • (PMID = 28399251.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-3598
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Li Z, Maglione M, Tu W, Mojica W, Arterburn D, Shugarman LR, Hilton L, Suttorp M, Solomon V, Shekelle PG, Morton SC: Meta-analysis: pharmacologic treatment of obesity. Ann Intern Med; 2005 Apr 5;142(7):532-46
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Meta-analysis: pharmacologic treatment of obesity.
  • BACKGROUND: In response to the increase in obesity, pharmacologic treatments for weight loss have become more numerous and more commonly used.
  • PURPOSE: To assess the efficacy and safety of weight loss medications approved by the U.S.
  • Food and Drug Administration and other medications that have been used for weight loss.
  • DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases, experts in the field, and unpublished information.
  • STUDY SELECTION: Up-to-date meta-analyses of sibutramine, phentermine, and diethylpropion were identified.
  • The authors assessed in detail 50 studies of orlistat, 13 studies of fluoxetine, 5 studies of bupropion, 9 studies of topiramate, and 1 study each of sertraline and zonisamide.
  • Meta-analysis was performed for all medications except sertraline, zonisamide, and fluoxetine, which are summarized narratively.
  • DATA EXTRACTION: The authors abstracted information about study design, intervention, co-interventions, population, outcomes, and methodologic quality, as well as weight loss and adverse events from controlled trials of medication.
  • DATA SYNTHESIS: All pooled weight loss values are reported relative to placebo.
  • A meta-analysis of sibutramine reported a mean difference in weight loss of 4.45 kg (95% CI, 3.62 to 5.29 kg) at 12 months.
  • In the meta-analysis of orlistat, the estimate of the mean weight loss for orlistat-treated patients was 2.89 kg (CI, 2.27 to 3.51 kg) at 12 months.
  • A recent meta-analysis of phentermine and diethylpropion reported pooled mean differences in weight loss at 6 months of 3.6 kg (CI, 0.6 to 6.0 kg) for phentermine-treated patients and 3.0 kg (CI, -1.6 to 11.5 kg) for diethylpropion-treated patients.
  • Weight loss in fluoxetine studies ranged from 14.5 kg of weight lost to 0.4 kg of weight gained at 12 or more months.
  • For bupropion, 2.77 kg (CI, 1.1 to 4.5 kg) of weight was lost at 6 to 12 months.
  • Weight loss due to topiramate at 6 months was 6.5% (CI, 4.8% to 8.3%) of pretreatment weight.
  • With one exception, long-term studies of health outcomes were lacking.
  • Significant side effects that varied by drug were reported.
  • LIMITATIONS: Publication bias may exist despite a comprehensive search and despite the lack of statistical evidence for the existence of bias.
  • Evidence of heterogeneity was observed for all meta-analyses.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Sibutramine, orlistat, phentermine, probably diethylpropion, bupropion, probably fluoxetine, and topiramate promote modest weight loss when given along with recommendations for diet.
  • Sibutramine and orlistat are the 2 most-studied drugs.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Obesity Agents / therapeutic use. Obesity / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Humans. Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic. Weight Loss

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Obesity.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Obesity.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] ACP J Club. 2005 Sep-Oct;143(2):50 [16134924.001]
  • [SummaryForPatientsIn] Ann Intern Med. 2005 Apr 5;142(7):I55 [15809458.001]
  • (PMID = 15809465.001).
  • [ISSN] 1539-3704
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of internal medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Intern. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Obesity Agents
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Shekelle PG, Newberry S, Maglione M, Li Z, Yermilov I, Hilton L, Suttorp M, Maggard M, Carter J, Tringale C, Chen S: Bariatric surgery in women of reproductive age: special concerns for pregnancy. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep); 2008 Nov;(169):1-51
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Bariatric surgery in women of reproductive age: special concerns for pregnancy.
  • CONTEXT: The use of bariatric surgery for treating severe obesity has increased dramatically over the past 10 years; about half of patients who undergo these procedures are women of reproductive age.
  • This report was commissioned to measure the incidence of bariatric surgery in this population and review the evidence on the impact of bariatric surgery on fertility and subsequent pregnancy.
  • OBJECTIVES: To measure the incidence of contemporary bariatric surgery procedures in women age 18-45 and to assess its impact on fertility, contraception, prepregnancy risk factors, and pregnancy outcomes, including those of neonates.
  • DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), a national sample of over 1,000 hospitals, to measure the trend in the number of women of reproductive age who underwent bariatric procedures from 1998-2005.
  • We searched numerous electronic databases, including MEDLINE and Embase, for potentially relevant studies involving bariatric surgery (gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric band, vertical-banded gastroplasty, biliopancreatic diversion), and consequent fertility, contraception, pregnancy, weight management, maternal and neonatal outcomes, and nutritional deficiencies.
  • We scanned reference lists for additional relevant articles and contacted experts in the fields of bariatric surgery and obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN).
  • Of 223 screened articles, we accepted 57 that reported on fertility following surgery (19 articles), contraception use/recommendations (11), maternal weight or nutrition management (28), maternal outcomes including morbidity and mortality (48), cesarean-section rates (16), and neonatal outcomes (44).
  • These articles included reports on gastric bypass, both open and laparoscopic (27 articles), laparoscopic adjustable band (15), biliopancreatic diversion (16), and vertical-banded gastroplasty (6).
  • Studies could contribute to one or more analyses.
  • We found one case-control study and the observational data accepted included 12 cohort studies, 21 case series, and 23 individual case reports.
  • DATA EXTRACTION: We abstracted information about study design, fertility history, fertility outcomes, prepregnancy weight loss, nutritional management, outcomes following pregnancy, and adverse events (during pregnancy) related to surgery.
  • DATA SYNTHESIS: Nationally representative data showed a six-fold increase in bariatric surgery inpatient procedures from 1998 to 2005.
  • Women age 18-45 accounted for about half of the patients undergoing bariatric surgery; over 50,000 have these procedures as inpatients annually.
  • An unknown number have outpatient bariatric procedures.
  • We identified one case-control study that directly addressed some of the key questions, but no randomized controlled trials or prospective cohort studies, which would be the strongest study designs to answer questions about effectiveness, risk and prognosis.
  • Consequently, all of our conclusions are limited by the available data, and are cautious.The evidence suggests that bariatric surgery results in improved fertility; the strongest evidence is in women with the polycystic ovarian syndrome, where biochemical studies showing normalization of hormones after surgery support case series data.
  • Observational studies (retrospective cohorts and case series) suggest that fertility improves following bariatric procedures and weight loss; similar to that seen when obese women lose weight through nonsurgical means.
  • There is almost no evidence on post-surgical contraceptive efficacy or use.
  • Research is needed to determine whether differences in absorption, particularly for oral contraceptives, affect contraceptive efficacy.
  • Nutrient deficiencies were reported in infants born to women who underwent procedures that resulted in malabsorption, as well as women who did not take prenatal vitamins or had difficulty with their own nutrition (i.e., from chronic vomiting).
  • Literature suggests that gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable band procedures confer only minimal, if any, increased risk of nutritional or congenital problems if supplemental vitamins are taken and maternal nutrition is otherwise adequate.
  • Biliopancreatic diversion has an appreciable risk for nutritional problems in some patients.
  • Women who have undergone bariatric surgery may have less risk than obese women for certain pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and pregnancy induced hypertension.
  • There is no evidence that cesarean section rates and delivery complications are higher in the post-surgery group, but data are limited.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss procedures are being performed more frequently to treat morbid obesity, with a six-fold increase over a recent 7-year time span; almost half of all patients are women of reproductive age.
  • The level of evidence on fertility, contraception, and pregnancy outcomes is limited to observational studies.
  • Data suggest that fertility improves after bariatric surgical procedures, nutritional deficiencies for mother and child are minimal, and maternal and neonatal outcomes are acceptable with laparoscopic adjustable band and gastric bypass as long as adequate maternal nutrition and vitamin supplementation are maintained.
  • There is no evidence that delivery complications are higher in post-surgery pregnancies.
  • [MeSH-major] Bariatric Surgery / methods. Obesity, Morbid / surgery. Pregnancy Complications / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Pregnancy


5. Lorenz KA, Lynn J, Dy S, Wilkinson A, Mularski RA, Shugarman LR, Hughes R, Asch SM, Rolon C, Rastegar A, Shekelle PG: Quality measures for symptoms and advance care planning in cancer: a systematic review. J Clin Oncol; 2006 Oct 20;24(30):4933-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Quality measures for symptoms and advance care planning in cancer: a systematic review.
  • PURPOSE: Measuring quality of care for symptom management and ascertaining patient goals offers an important step toward improving palliative cancer management.
  • This study was designed to identify systematically the quality measures and the evidence to support their use in pain, dyspnea, depression, and advance care planning (ACP), and to identify research gaps.
  • METHODS: English-language documents were selected from MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, PsycINFO (1995 to 2005); Internet-based searches; and contact with measure developers.
  • We used terms for each domain to select studies throughout the cancer care continuum.
  • We included measures that expressed a normative relationship to quality, specified the target population, and specified the indicated care.
  • Dual data review and abstraction was performed by palliative care researchers describing populations, testing, and attributes for each measure.
  • RESULTS: A total of 4,599 of 5,182 titles were excluded at abstract review.
  • Of 537 remaining articles, 19 contained measures for ACP, six contained measures for depression, five contained measures for dyspnea, and 20 contained measures for pain.
  • We identified 10 relevant measure sets that included 36 fully specified or fielded measures and 14 additional measures (16 for pain, five for dyspnea, four for depression, and 25 for ACP).
  • Most measures were unpublished, and few had been tested in a cancer population.
  • We were unable to describe the specifications of all measures fully and did not search for measures for pain and depression that were not cancer specific.
  • CONCLUSION: Measures are available for assessing quality and guiding improvement in palliative cancer care.
  • Existing measures are weighted toward ACP, and more nonpain symptom measures are needed.
  • Additional testing is needed before the measures are used for accountability, and basic research is required to address measurement when self-report is impaired.
  • [MeSH-major] Advance Care Planning / standards. Palliative Care / standards. Quality Assurance, Health Care / methods. Quality Indicators, Health Care
  • [MeSH-minor] Depression / etiology. Depression / therapy. Dyspnea / etiology. Dyspnea / therapy. Humans. Neoplasms / complications. Neoplasms / therapy. Pain / etiology. Pain Management. Quality of Life

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Palliative Care.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17050878.001).
  • [ISSN] 1527-7755
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Clin. Oncol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Hummel M, Schüler S, Hempel S, Rees W, Hetzer R: Obstructive bronchial aspergillosis after heart transplantation. Mycoses; 1993 Nov-Dec;36(11-12):425-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Obstructive bronchial aspergillosis after heart transplantation.
  • Obstructive bronchial aspergillosis is a rarely observed consequence of Aspergillus infection.
  • It occurs not only in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), but also after heart transplantation (HTx) if T cells are reduced markedly by the application of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in addition to immunosuppression with corticosteroids.
  • In contrast to invasive aspergillosis or Aspergillus tracheobronchitis, the course of this form of Aspergillus infection may not be accompanied by symptoms, because bronchial inflammation with pseudomembranes, ulcers or destruction of mucosa and intrapulmonary infiltrates are absent.
  • To prevent invasive aspergillosis following HTx, intensive antifungal therapy is necessary in cases of bronchial obstructive aspergillosis, because this form of Aspergillus infection seems to represent a stage before recognizable invasive disease, as in other immunocompromised patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Aspergillosis / etiology. Heart Transplantation / adverse effects. Lung Diseases, Fungal / etiology. Lung Diseases, Obstructive / etiology. Opportunistic Infections / etiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Male. Middle Aged


7. Danz M, Sänger J, Friedrichsen K, Linss W: 2-Acetylaminofluorene-produced selective cytotoxic damage of a ductal compartment and its repair in the submandibular gland of rats. Cell Tissue Res; 1997 May;288(2):371-9
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] 2-Acetylaminofluorene-produced selective cytotoxic damage of a ductal compartment and its repair in the submandibular gland of rats.
  • Salivary glands of rodents are rarely affected with spontaneous and induced malignancies.
  • This may be linked with low physiologic cell renewal and the infrequency of cytolethal actions by xenobiotics.
  • The genotoxic 2-acetylaminofluorene, carcinogenic for other organs, causes acute damage in salivary ducts.
  • In the submandibular glands the damage is limited to the granulated convoluted tubules.
  • They produce and release regulatory peptides including epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor.
  • The partial chemical sialoadenectomy is repaired by sequential cell proliferation in the basal cell layer of interlobular ducts and in dilated intralobular ducts (day 4 and 6), in intermediate duct-like structures (day 6 and 8), and lastly in acini (day 8 and 12).
  • This is associated with a transient loss of structural characteristics of striated ducts and acini (up to day 6) and of the immunoreactivity for S-100 protein (up to day 4).
  • Actin immunoreactivity at the acinar base is increased from day 6 to 20.
  • Analogous to the late postnatal differentiation of the granulated convoluted tubules, their structural characteristics and immunoreactivity for epidermal growth factor do not recover within 20 days.
  • The acute lesion of the endocrine ductal segment is suggested to be causally involved with other systemic effects following treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene.
  • First, hypophagia with loss of body, liver and thymus weight may result from disturbed saliva production.
  • Second, previous studies have shown a mitotic burst of the biliary epithelium and bloodborne lymphocyte-stimulating activities.
  • Either effect could be brought about by regulatory peptides (see above), probably after elevated circulatory release from necrotic granulated convoluted tubules.
  • [MeSH-major] 2-Acetylaminofluorene / toxicity. Mutagens / toxicity. Salivary Ducts / drug effects. Submandibular Gland / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Body Weight / drug effects. Cell Survival / drug effects. Male. Organ Size / drug effects. Rats. Rats, Wistar

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. 2-ACETYLAMINOFLUORENE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 9082973.001).
  • [ISSN] 0302-766X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cell and tissue research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell Tissue Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] GERMANY
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mutagens; 9M98QLJ2DL / 2-Acetylaminofluorene
  •  go-up   go-down


8. O'Meara S, Nelson EA, Golder S, Dalton JE, Craig D, Iglesias C, DASIDU Steering Group: Systematic review of methods to diagnose infection in foot ulcers in diabetes. Diabet Med; 2006 Apr;23(4):341-7
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Systematic review of methods to diagnose infection in foot ulcers in diabetes.
  • AIM: To undertake a systematic review of the diagnostic performance of clinical examination, sample acquisition and sample analysis in infected foot ulcers in diabetes.
  • METHODS: Nineteen electronic databases plus other sources were searched.
  • To be included, studies had to fulfil the following criteria: (i) compare a method of clinical assessment, sample collection or sample analysis with a reference standard;.
  • (ii) recruit diabetic individuals with foot ulcers;.
  • (ii) present 2 x 2 diagnostic data.
  • Studies were critically appraised using a 12-item checklist.
  • RESULTS: Three eligible studies were identified, one each on clinical examination, sample collection and sample analysis.
  • For all three, study groups were heterogeneous with respect to wound type and a small proportion of participants had foot ulcers due to diabetes.
  • No studies identified an optimum reference standard.
  • Other methodological problems included non-blind interpretation of tests and the time lag between index and reference tests.
  • Individual signs or symptoms of infection did not prove to be useful tests when assessed against punch biopsy as the reference standard.
  • The wound swab did not perform well when assessed against tissue biopsy.
  • Semiquantitative analysis of wound swab might be a useful alternative to quantitative analysis.
  • The limitations of these findings and their impact on recommendations from relevant clinical guidelines are discussed.
  • CONCLUSION: Given the importance of this topic, it is surprising that only three eligible studies were identified.
  • It was not possible to describe the optimal methods of diagnosing infection in diabetic patients with foot ulceration from the evidence identified in this systematic review.
  • [MeSH-major] Diabetic Foot / microbiology. Infection / diagnosis
  • [MeSH-minor] Biopsy. Humans. Sensitivity and Specificity. Specimen Handling / methods

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Diabetes.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Diabetic Foot.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] Diabet Med. 2006 Apr;23(4):339-40 [16620260.001]
  • (PMID = 16620261.001).
  • [ISSN] 0742-3071
  • [Journal-full-title] Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Diabet. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 23
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Mittman BS, Kanouse DE, Rubenstein LV: Effecting change in physician practice as health care systems consolidate. Jt Comm J Qual Improv; 1995 Oct;21(10):508-11
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effecting change in physician practice as health care systems consolidate.
  • [MeSH-major] Delivery of Health Care, Integrated / standards. Total Quality Management
  • [MeSH-minor] Group Practice. Organizational Innovation. United States

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentOn] Jt Comm J Qual Improv. 1995 Jul;21(7):317-68 [7581730.001]
  • (PMID = 8556107.001).
  • [ISSN] 1070-3241
  • [Journal-full-title] The Joint Commission journal on quality improvement
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Jt Comm J Qual Improv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comment; Letter
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Chung M, Newberry SJ, Ansari MT, Yu WW, Wu H, Lee J, Suttorp M, Gaylor JM, Motala A, Moher D, Balk EM, Shekelle PG: Two methods provide similar signals for the need to update systematic reviews. J Clin Epidemiol; 2012 Jun;65(6):660-8
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Two methods provide similar signals for the need to update systematic reviews.
  • OBJECTIVE: Apply and compare two methods that identify signals for the need to update systematic reviews, using three Evidence-based Practice Center reports on omega-3 fatty acids as test cases.
  • STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We applied the RAND method, which uses domain (subject matter) expert guidance, and a modified Ottawa method, which uses quantitative and qualitative signals.
  • For both methods, we conducted focused electronic literature searches of recent studies using the key terms from the original reports.
  • We assessed the agreement between the methods and qualitatively assessed the merits of each system.
  • RESULTS: Agreement between the two methods was "substantial" or better (kappa>0.62) in three of the four systematic reviews.
  • Overall agreement between the methods was "substantial" (kappa=0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45-0.83).
  • CONCLUSION: The RAND and modified Ottawa methods appear to provide similar signals for the possible need to update systematic reviews in this pilot study.
  • Future evaluation with a broader range of clinical topics and eventual comparisons between signals to update reports and the results of full evidence review updates will be needed.
  • We propose a hybrid approach combining the best features of both methods, which should allow efficient review and assessment of the need to update.
  • [MeSH-major] Fatty Acids, Omega-3. Information Storage and Retrieval / standards. Periodicals as Topic / standards. Review Literature as Topic
  • [MeSH-minor] Confidence Intervals. Evidence-Based Medicine. Humans. Pilot Projects

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jun;85(6):1448-56 [17556679.001]
  • [Cites] Atherosclerosis. 2006 Nov;189(1):19-30 [16530201.001]
  • [Cites] Atherosclerosis. 2006 Feb;184(2):237-46 [16084516.001]
  • [Cites] BMC Med Res Methodol. 2005;5:33 [16225692.001]
  • [Cites] Biometrics. 1977 Mar;33(1):159-74 [843571.001]
  • [Cites] Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(1):MR000023 [18254126.001]
  • [Cites] Evid Rep Technol Assess (Summ). 2004 Mar;(93):1-6 [15133887.001]
  • [Cites] PLoS One. 2010;5(4):e9914 [20376338.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 2001 Sep 26;286(12):1461-7 [11572738.001]
  • [Cites] BMJ. 2001 Jul 21;323(7305):155-7 [11463690.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Epidemiol. 2010 May;63(5):491-501 [19540721.001]
  • [Cites] Atherosclerosis. 2009 Oct;206(2):535-9 [19447387.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Intern Med. 2007 Aug 21;147(4):224-33 [17638714.001]
  • (PMID = 22464414.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-5921
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of clinical epidemiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Clin Epidemiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / T32 HL069772
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fatty Acids, Omega-3
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS585944; NLM/ PMC4141462
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement