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Items 1 to 10 of about 830
1. Alvarez CP, Davidson PM, Fleming C, Glass NE: Elements of Effective Interventions for Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Latina Women: A Systematic Review. PLoS One; 2016;11(8):e0160518
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Elements of Effective Interventions for Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Latina Women: A Systematic Review.
  • BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence remains a global problem and is of particular concern in Latina diasporas.
  • AIM: To identify effective elements of interventions to address intimate partner violence in Latina women.
  • METHOD: The systematic review was undertaken according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines.
  • We focused the search on intervention studies assessing intimate partner violence as an outcome measure and on publications in English and Spanish from the last 11 years (2004-2015).
  • RESULTS: Despite the scope of the problem, from the 1,274 studies screened only four met the search criteria and only a single study included an exclusive Latino population.
  • Of the four interventions, one was only as effective as the control treatment.
  • Heterogeneity of study populations and designs prohibited meta-analytic methods.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Theoretically derived interventions that are gender specific, culturally appropriate, target mutual aid through group dynamics, and that are developed collaboratively with the target population are likely to be most effective.
  • [MeSH-major] Hispanic Americans. Intimate Partner Violence / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

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  • (PMID = 27504833.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4978383
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2. Smith LM, Davidson PM, Halcomb EJ, Andrew S: Can lay responder defibrillation programmes improve survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? Aust Crit Care; 2007 Nov;20(4):137-45
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  • [Title] Can lay responder defibrillation programmes improve survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?
  • INTRODUCTION: The importance of early defibrillation in improving outcomes and reducing morbidity following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest underscores the importance of examining novel approaches to treatment access.
  • The increasing evidence to support the importance of early defibrillation has increased attention on the potential for lay responders to deliver this therapy.
  • AIM: This paper seeks to critically review the literature that evaluates the impact of lay responder defibrillator programs on survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the adult population.
  • METHOD: The electronic databases, Medline and CINAHL, were searched using keywords including; "first responder", "lay responder", "defibrillation" and "cardiac arrest".
  • The reference lists of retrieved articles and the Internet were also searched.
  • Articles were included in the review if they reported primary data, in the English language, which described the effect of a lay responder defibrillation program on survival to hospital discharge from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in adults.
  • RESULTS: Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria.
  • The small number of published studies, heterogeneity of study populations and study outcome methods prohibited formal meta-analysis.
  • Therefore, narrative analysis was undertaken.
  • Studies included in this report provided inconsistent findings in relation to survival to hospital discharge following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
  • CONCLUSION: Although there are limited data, the role of the lay responder appears promising in improving the outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest following early defibrillation.
  • Despite the inherent methodological difficulties in studying this population, future research should address outcomes related to morbidity, mortality and cost-effectiveness.
  • [MeSH-major] Electric Countershock. Emergency Treatment. Heart Arrest / mortality. Heart Arrest / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Defibrillators. Health Services Accessibility. Humans. Patient Discharge. Volunteers

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  • (PMID = 17931879.001).
  • [ISSN] 1036-7314
  • [Journal-full-title] Australian critical care : official journal of the Confederation of Australian Critical Care Nurses
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Aust Crit Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Number-of-references] 46
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3. Daly J, Jackson D, Davidson PM, Wade V, Chin C, Brimelow V: The experiences of female spouses of survivors of acute myocardial infarction: a pilot study of Lebanese-born women in south-western Sydney, Australia. J Adv Nurs; 1998 Dec;28(6):1199-206
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  • [Title] The experiences of female spouses of survivors of acute myocardial infarction: a pilot study of Lebanese-born women in south-western Sydney, Australia.
  • Lebanese migrants form a significant proportion of the population in southwestern Sydney (SWS), and in New South Wales, Australia.
  • This pilot study was undertaken in south-western Sydney, a rapidly expanding and socioeconomically disadvantaged region, to explore the experiences of English speaking women of Lebanese origin whose spouses had recently experienced an acute myocardial infarction (AMI).
  • Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven Lebanese-born women at 2- and 4-week intervals, following the discharge of their husbands from hospital.
  • Qualitative analysis of narrative text revealed four distinct themes.
  • These were: struggle to resolve distress; intensive monitoring of the AMI survivor; searching for avenues of support; and reflecting on the future.
  • Study findings are discussed in relation to the literature.
  • Implications for nursing practice and research are drawn from study findings.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Psychological. Convalescence / psychology. Emigration and Immigration. Myocardial Infarction / ethnology. Spouses / ethnology. Spouses / psychology. Stress, Psychological / ethnology. Stress, Psychological / psychology. Survivors / psychology. Women / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Lebanon / ethnology. Longitudinal Studies. Middle Aged. Needs Assessment. New South Wales. Nursing Methodology Research. Pilot Projects. Surveys and Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 9888364.001).
  • [ISSN] 0309-2402
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of advanced nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Adv Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
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4. Davidson PM, Johnson MJ: Update on the role of palliative oxygen. Curr Opin Support Palliat Care; 2011 Jun;5(2):87-91
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  • [Title] Update on the role of palliative oxygen.
  • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Breathlessness remains a frequent and burdensome symptom for individuals with life-limiting symptoms in both malignant and nonmalignant settings.
  • As oxygen therapy is frequently given as part of the management of breathlessness and is associated with costs, treatment burden and potential dangers, it is timely to review the efficacy and appropriateness of palliative oxygen therapy.
  • RECENT FINDINGS: Despite the widespread use of oxygen therapy in clinical and community settings, data supporting this approach is sparse.
  • The benefits of long-term oxygen therapy for severely hypoxaemic people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are proven; however, mounting evidence suggests that oxygen does not confer additional benefit over medical air for the relief of refractory breathlessness in people with mild or absent hypoxaemia.
  • SUMMARY: On the basis of the findings of this review, the routine use of palliative oxygen therapy without detailed assessment of pathogenesis and reversibility of symptoms cannot be justified.
  • Promoting self-management strategies, such as cool airflow across the face, exercise and psychological support for patients and carers, should be considered before defaulting to oxygen therapy.
  • If palliative oxygen therapy is considered for individuals with transient or mild hypoxaemia, a therapeutic trial should be conducted with clinical review after 3 days to assess the net clinical benefit and patient preference.
  • [MeSH-major] Dyspnea / therapy. Oxygen Inhalation Therapy / trends. Palliative Care / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Cost-Benefit Analysis. Humans. Severity of Illness Index

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  • (PMID = 21532348.001).
  • [ISSN] 1751-4266
  • [Journal-full-title] Current opinion in supportive and palliative care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Opin Support Palliat Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Davidson PM: Early function concepts: their development and relation to certain mathematical and logical abilities. Child Dev; 1987 Dec;58(6):1542-55
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  • [Title] Early function concepts: their development and relation to certain mathematical and logical abilities.
  • Cognition of functions (i.e., y = f(x)) has been identified as an achievement of early childhood.
  • To investigate the development of function concepts and their relation to mathematical and logical abilities typically acquired during the age period of 5-7 years, 72 children in this age range were tested on nonnumerical function tasks (functions as exchange of properties, functions as displacement of positions, and functions as preservation of structure), numerical tasks (number conservation and arithmetic problems), and aspects of logical reasoning (class inclusion, class vicariance, and seriation).
  • Orderly developmental trends were found in function task performance, with younger children manifesting limited success through trial-and-error strategies and older children achieving substantial success with anticipatory strategies.
  • Moreover, certain function abilities were associated with the numerical domain, whereas others were associated with the logical domain.
  • The findings are consistent with the developmental model of Piaget et al. according to which cognition of functions lays the groundwork for reversible operations, but also suggest that this development occurs through parallel processes within separate conceptual domains.
  • [MeSH-major] Child Development. Concept Formation. Mathematics
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Logic. Problem Solving

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  • (PMID = 3691201.001).
  • [ISSN] 0009-3920
  • [Journal-full-title] Child development
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Child Dev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIMH NIH HHS / MH / 1 F31 MH08822-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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6. Wilson CJ, Theodoulou A, Damarell RA, Krishnan J: Knee instability as the primary cause of failure following Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA): A systematic review on the patient, surgical and implant characteristics of revised TKA patients. Knee; 2017 Dec;24(6):1271-1281
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  • [Title] Knee instability as the primary cause of failure following Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA): A systematic review on the patient, surgical and implant characteristics of revised TKA patients.
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of this review was to systematically assess the current evidence available regarding knee instability after TKA to identify time to failure between primary and revision TKA.
  • In addition, we considered the patient, surgical and implant characteristics of primary TKA patients revised for knee instability, and investigated methods used for knee instability diagnosis.
  • METHODS: A systematic search of six databases and the unpublished literature was performed.
  • Studies referring to instability in post-operative primary TKA patients, reporting on revision TKA due to instability, and published or available between 2005 to 30-Mar-2015 were eligible for inclusion.
  • Quantitative data for continuous variables were pooled in statistical meta-analyses.
  • RESULTS: A total of 1841 unique studies were identified, 42 of which met the selection criteria and a total of 22 studies included in the review.
  • Time to failure between primary and revision TKA was 44.7months (95% CI [33.8, 55.7]), and the weighted mean age at time of revision surgery was 67.6years (95% CI [65.38, 69.75]).
  • A gender distribution was identified, with approximately 16.4% more females revised for instability, however this was unable to be corrected for the baseline population.
  • The majority of studies used a combination of radiographic and clinical testing to diagnose knee instability.
  • CONCLUSION: Research on knee instability following primary TKA reported early failure and subsequent revision knee surgery.
  • The need for revision due to instability was frequently reported in a younger patient cohort and most commonly in female TKA patients.
  • Early revision at a younger age highlights the severe implications of an unstable knee.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28970123.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-5800
  • [Journal-full-title] The Knee
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Knee
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Early failure / Knee instability / Prosthetic failure / Revision / Total knee arthroplasty
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7. Halcomb EJ, Davidson PM: Is verbatim transcription of interview data always necessary? Appl Nurs Res; 2006 Feb;19(1):38-42
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  • [Title] Is verbatim transcription of interview data always necessary?
  • Verbatim transcription of interview data has become a common data management strategy in nursing research and is widely considered to be integral to the analysis and interpretation of verbal data.
  • As the benefits of verbal data are becoming more widely embraced in health care research, interviews are being increasingly used to collect information for a wide range of purposes.
  • In addition to purely qualitative investigations, there has been a significant increase in the conduct of mixed-method inquiries.
  • This article examines the issues surrounding the conduct of interviews in mixed-method research, with particular emphasis on the transcription and data analysis phases of data management.
  • It also debates on the necessity to transcribe all audiorecorded interview data verbatim, particularly in relation to mixed-method investigations.
  • Finally, it provides an alternative method to verbatim transcription of managing audiorecorded interview data.
  • [MeSH-major] Interviews as Topic / methods. Nursing Research / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Tape Recording

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  • (PMID = 16455440.001).
  • [ISSN] 0897-1897
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied nursing research : ANR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl Nurs Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 21
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8. Haghshenas A, Davidson PM: Quality service delivery in cardiac rehabilitation: cross-cultural challenges in an Australian setting. Qual Prim Care; 2011;19(4):215-21
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  • [Title] Quality service delivery in cardiac rehabilitation: cross-cultural challenges in an Australian setting.
  • BACKGROUND: Cardiac rehabilitation is an evidence-based health service model for providing secondary prevention strategies following an acute cardiac event.
  • In spite of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation, there are striking cultural and ethnic disparities with regard to access to and usage of these programmes.
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the challenges in providing cardiac rehabilitation to culturally diverse populations in Australia to inform culturally competent care.
  • METHOD: This was a qualitative study using interviews with 25 health professionals from diverse professional and language backgrounds working in cardiac rehabilitation and participant observation of educational and counselling sessions in four cardiac rehabilitation programmes in metropolitan Sydney, Australia.
  • RESULTS: Providing cardiac rehabilitation to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds presented greater challenges than did provision to the mainstream population.
  • These challenges resulted from the interaction of multiple and complex factors such as patients, providers, structural and organisational characteristics within the treatment setting.
  • Communication issues, reconciling health messages with culturally specific issues such as diet, social and family structure and implementation of self-management strategies are significant challenges.
  • CONCLUSION: Strategies are needed to overcome cross-cultural challenges and ensure effective and equitable cardiac rehabilitation service delivery.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiovascular Diseases / rehabilitation. Communication. Cross-Cultural Comparison. Quality of Health Care / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Australia. Cultural Competency. Female. Health Personnel. Humans. Male. Qualitative Research. Urban Population

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  • (PMID = 21902900.001).
  • [ISSN] 1479-1072
  • [Journal-full-title] Quality in primary care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Qual Prim Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] England
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9. Davidson PM: The role of the nurse-practitioner in breast care. Adm Radiol; 1987 Nov;6(11):62-5
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  • [Title] The role of the nurse-practitioner in breast care.
  • Why have a nurse-practitioner in a breast center?
  • This question is appropriate, although it may generate controversy.
  • A hospital-based or freestanding breast diagnostic center that hires a nurse-practitioner is functioning outside the norm.
  • It is unusual to find a nurse-practitioner providing services to women in a breast diagnostic center and representing that center in the community.
  • Until recently, breast diagnostic centers have focused primarily on imaging.
  • However, a breast center wishing to expand services to its patients and referring healthcare providers, as well as market its services to the surrounding community could employ such a nurse.
  • Two issues need to be addressed when discussing the nurse-practitioner in the breast diagnostic center: defining a role for this nurse, which this article discusses, and supporting this role once it is in place.
  • [MeSH-major] Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis. Cancer Care Facilities / organization & administration. Health Services Administration. Hospitals, Special / organization & administration. Nurse Practitioners. Women's Health Services / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Protocols. Colorado. Female. Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299. Humans. Role

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  • (PMID = 10285609.001).
  • [ISSN] 0738-6974
  • [Journal-full-title] Administrative radiology : AR
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Adm Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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10. Boland JS, Davidson PM, Bruce B, Weiss J: Cations reduce antimicrobial efficacy of lysozyme-chelator combinations. J Food Prot; 2004 Feb;67(2):285-94
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  • [Title] Cations reduce antimicrobial efficacy of lysozyme-chelator combinations.
  • Reduction of the antimicrobial efficacy of lysozyme-chelator combinations against two Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains on addition of mineral salts was studied.
  • The objective of the study was to determine the effect of type and concentration of mono-, di-, and trivalent mineral salts on the antimicrobial effectiveness of lysozyme and various chelators against E. coli O157:H7.
  • Seven salts (Al3+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, K+, Mg2+, and Na+) at 1 to 10 mM were added to aqueous solutions of lysozyme and disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), disodium pyrophosphate (DSPP), or pentasodium tripolyphosphate (PSTPP) at pH 6, 7, or 8 and applied to cultures of E. coli O157:H7 strains 932 and H1730.
  • Inhibitory activity of lysozyme chelator combinations against both strains was completely lost after addition of > or = 1 mM Ca2+ and Mg2+ at pH 7 and 8.
  • At pH 6, antimicrobial activity of lysozyme-EDTA against both strains was retained in the presence of calcium or magnesium cations.
  • DSPP-lysozyme inhibited strain H1730 at pH 6 despite the presence of Mg2+.
  • Concentrations above 4 mM Fe2+ neutralized activity of all lysozyme-chelator combinations.
  • Reversal of inhibition by lysozyme-chelator complexes by the monovalent Na+ and K+ ions depended on E. coli O157:H7 strain type.
  • Neither monovalent cation reversed inhibition of strain 932.
  • However, Na+ and K+ reversed lysozyme-chelator inhibition of strain H1730.
  • The addition of > or = 1 mM Fe3+ or Al3+ was effective in reversing inhibition of both strains by lysozyme and EDTA at pH 6, 7, and 8.
  • Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to determine the amount of ion-specific competitive binding of free cations by EDTA-lysozyme combinations.
  • A mechanistic model for the antimicrobial functionality of chelator-lysozyme combinations is proposed.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Infective Agents / pharmacology. Cations / pharmacology. Chelating Agents / pharmacology. Escherichia coli O157 / drug effects. Food Microbiology. Muramidase / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Diphosphates. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Synergism. Edetic Acid. Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Kinetics. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Models, Biological

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  • (PMID = 14968960.001).
  • [ISSN] 0362-028X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of food protection
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Food Prot.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Infective Agents; 0 / Cations; 0 / Chelating Agents; 0 / Diphosphates; 9G34HU7RV0 / Edetic Acid; EC 3.2.1.17 / Muramidase; O352864B8Z / sodium pyrophosphate
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