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Items 1 to 10 of about 1643
1. Newman D, Pilson D: INCREASED PROBABILITY OF EXTINCTION DUE TO DECREASED GENETIC EFFECTIVE POPULATION SIZE: EXPERIMENTAL POPULATIONS OF CLARKIA PULCHELLA. Evolution; 1997 Apr;51(2):354-362
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  • [Title] INCREASED PROBABILITY OF EXTINCTION DUE TO DECREASED GENETIC EFFECTIVE POPULATION SIZE: EXPERIMENTAL POPULATIONS OF CLARKIA PULCHELLA.
  • We established replicated experimental populations of the annual plant Clarkia pulchella to evaluate the existence of a causal relationship between loss of genetic variation and population survival probability.
  • Two treatments differing in the relatedness of the founders, and thus in the genetic effective population size (N<sub>e</sub> ), were maintained as isolated populations in a natural environment.
  • After three generations, the low N<sub>e</sub> treatment had significantly lower germination and survival rates than did the high N<sub>e</sub> treatment.
  • These lower germination and survival rates led to decreased mean fitness in the low N<sub>e</sub> populations: estimated mean fitness in the low N<sub>e</sub> populations was only 21% of the estimated mean fitness in the high N<sub>e</sub> populations.
  • This inbreeding depression led to a reduction in population survival: at the conclusion of the experiment, 75% of the high N<sub>e</sub> populations were still extant, whereas only 31% of the low N<sub>e</sub> populations had survived.
  • Decreased genetic effective population size, which leads to both inbreeding and the loss of alleles by genetic drift, increased the probability of population extinction over that expected from demographic and environmental stochasticity alone.
  • This demonstrates that the genetic effective population size can strongly affect the probability of population persistence.

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  • [Copyright] © 1997 The Society for the Study of Evolution.
  • (PMID = 28565367.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-5646
  • [Journal-full-title] Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Evolution
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Clarkia pulchella / conservation biology / genetic bottleneck / genetic drift / genetic effective population size / inbreeding depression / population genetic variation / population survival
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2. Brubaker L, Harris T, Gleason D, Newman D, North B: The external urethral barrier for stress incontinence: a multicenter trial of safety and efficacy. Miniguard Investigators Group. Obstet Gynecol; 1999 Jun;93(6):932-7
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  • [Title] The external urethral barrier for stress incontinence: a multicenter trial of safety and efficacy. Miniguard Investigators Group.
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of an external urethral barrier for the management of mild to moderate stress urinary incontinence in adult women.
  • METHODS: Four hundred eleven women with the symptom of stress urinary incontinence in 12 United States centers participated.
  • Additional inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied before protocol device use, and ultimately 390 subjects began device use.
  • Outcome measures for efficacy and safety were assessed.
  • Efficacy was evaluated by the number of leakage episodes using a voiding diary, subjective urinary leakage severity, incontinence impact scores, and pad testing.
  • Safety was evaluated by symptom assessment, urinalysis, urine culture, measurement of postvoid residual urine volume, vulvar cytology, vaginal culture, and (n = 81) cystometric testing.
  • RESULTS: Efficacy was indicated by statistically significant reductions in the number of leakage episodes, subjective leakage severity scores, incontinence impact scores, and pad-test loss during device use.
  • The data also indicated that the device was safe, as evidenced by the lack of statistically significant changes in the percentage of subjects with urinary tract infections during device use or in postvoid residual urine volume and cystometric indices.
  • Symptoms of vulvar irritation or lower urinary tract discomfort occurred in a small percentage of subjects but were generally transient, and only three women discontinued using the device.
  • CONCLUSION: The external urethral barrier appears to be a safe nonsurgical alternative to absorbent products for the management of mild to moderate stress urinary incontinence in adult women.
  • [MeSH-major] Prostheses and Implants. Urinary Incontinence, Stress / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Humans. Middle Aged. Severity of Illness Index. Urethra

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  • (PMID = 10362157.001).
  • [ISSN] 0029-7844
  • [Journal-full-title] Obstetrics and gynecology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Obstet Gynecol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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3. Newman D, Tucci M, Puckett A, Hughes J, Benghuzzi H: The effect of polymer coating biomaterials individually and incombination on the behavior of transformed RAW macrophage cells. Biomed Sci Instrum; 1999;35:229-34
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  • [Title] The effect of polymer coating biomaterials individually and incombination on the behavior of transformed RAW macrophage cells.
  • The use of homopolymers as coatings for biomaterials has received much attention in the last decade.
  • However, the modifications and alterations induced by using such materials towards inflammatory cells have not been fully investigated.
  • The specific objectives of this study were to investigate the role of hetero and homopolymers of amino acids on cell proliferation, and to determine the biochemical behavior associated with the incubation of RAW cells with various polymers.
  • The RAW macrophage cell line was obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (Rockville, MD) and maintained in sterile media (RPMI) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotics and antimycotics.
  • The cells were plated at a density of 1 x 10(6) cells/ml onto 24 well plates.
  • The plates were divided into four groups of six wells per group per phase (24, 48, and 72 hours).
  • Cells in the first group were treated with RGD, cells in group II were treated with poly-L-lysine, group III cells were treated with RGD + poly-L-lysine, and cells in group IV were treated with media alone, and served as controls.
  • Cell number, as well as, protein, MDA, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and cytochrome C (cyto C) were determined at the end of 24, 48 and 72 hours.
  • Data obtained from this investigation revealed that: (I) there were no significant difference in total cell counts between all experimental groups and control at the end of the 48 hour phase.
  • However, at 24 hours there were fewer cells in the poly-L-lysine treated wells in comparison to control group (p < 0.05), (II) RGD and poly-L-lysine treatments did not cause changes in MDA or protein concentrations for the entire duration of the experiment, and (III) RGD treatment for 48 and 72 hours did not cause a reduction in the LDH activity compared to control and poly-L-lysine treated groups.
  • Data obtained from this investigation could provide more insight regarding the design and development for safe and biocompatible orthopedic, dental and drug delivery devices.
  • [MeSH-major] Biocompatible Materials / pharmacology. Coated Materials, Biocompatible. Macrophages / drug effects. Polymers / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Cell Division / drug effects. Cell Line, Transformed. Cytochrome c Group / metabolism. Humans. L-Lactate Dehydrogenase / metabolism. Malondialdehyde / metabolism. Oligopeptides / pharmacology. Polylysine / pharmacology. Proteins / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 11143352.001).
  • [ISSN] 0067-8856
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomedical sciences instrumentation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomed Sci Instrum
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biocompatible Materials; 0 / Coated Materials, Biocompatible; 0 / Cytochrome c Group; 0 / Oligopeptides; 0 / Polymers; 0 / Proteins; 25104-18-1 / Polylysine; 4Y8F71G49Q / Malondialdehyde; 99896-85-2 / arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid; EC 1.1.1.27 / L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
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4. Pushkin A, Abuladze N, Newman D, Lee I, Xu G, Kurtz I: Two C-terminal variants of NBC4, a new member of the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter family: cloning, characterization, and localization. IUBMB Life; 2000 Jul;50(1):13-9
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  • [Title] Two C-terminal variants of NBC4, a new member of the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter family: cloning, characterization, and localization.
  • We report the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal assignment of a new member of the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) family, NBC4.
  • The NBC4 gene was mapped to chromosome 2p13 and is a new candidate gene for Alstrom syndrome.
  • Two variants of the transporter have been isolated from human testis and heart, which differ in their C termini.
  • NBC4a encodes a 1137-residue polypeptide and is widely expressed in various tissues, including liver, testis, and spleen.
  • NBC4b is identical to NBC4a except that it has a 16-nucleotide insert, creating a C-terminal frame shift.
  • NBC4b encodes a 1074-residue polypeptide and is highly expressed in heart.
  • Amino acids 1-1046 are common to both NBC4 variants.
  • NBC4a has two protein-interacting domains that are lacking in NBC4b: a proline-rich sequence, PPPSVIKIP (amino acids 1102-1110), and a consensus PDZ-interacting domain, SYSL (1134-1137).
  • NBC4b lacks the stretch of charged residues present in the C terminus of NBC4a and other members of the NBC family.
  • Unlike other members of the NBC family, both NBC4a and NBC4b have a unique glycine-rich region (amino acids 440-469).
  • In comparison with other members of the bicarbonate transport superfamily, NBC4a and NBC4b are most similar structurally to the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBC1).
  • [MeSH-major] Carrier Proteins / genetics. Carrier Proteins / metabolism. Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Base Sequence. Cloning, Molecular. Heart / physiology. Humans. Liver / physiology. Male. Membrane Proteins / genetics. Membrane Proteins / metabolism. Molecular Sequence Data. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Sequence Homology, Amino Acid. Sodium-Bicarbonate Symporters. Spleen / physiology. Testis / physiology

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  • (PMID = 11087115.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-6543
  • [Journal-full-title] IUBMB life
  • [ISO-abbreviation] IUBMB Life
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] GENBANK/ AF207661/ AF243499
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK46976
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Sodium-Bicarbonate Symporters
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5. Boyack KW, Klavans R, Sorensen AA, Ioannidis JP: A list of highly influential biomedical researchers, 1996-2011. Eur J Clin Invest; 2013 Dec;43(12):1339-65
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  • [Title] A list of highly influential biomedical researchers, 1996-2011.
  • We have generated a list of highly influential biomedical researchers based on Scopus citation data from the period 1996-2011.
  • Of the 15,153,100 author identifiers in Scopus, approximately 1% (n=149,655) have an h-index >=20.
  • Of those, we selected 532 authors who belonged to the 400 with highest total citation count (>=25,142 citations) and/or the 400 with highest h-index (>=76).
  • Of those, we selected the top-400 living core biomedical researchers based on a normalized score combining total citations and h-index.
  • Another 62 authors whose focus is outside biomedicine had a normalized score that was at least as high as the score of the 400th core biomedical researcher.
  • We provide information on the profile of these most influential authors, including the most common Medical Subject Heading terms in their articles that are also specific to their work, most common journals where they publish, number of papers with over 100 citations that they have published as first/single, last, or middle authors, and impact score adjusted for authorship positions, given that crude citation indices and authorship positions are almost totally orthogonal.
  • We also show for each researcher the distribution of their papers across 4 main levels (basic-to-applied) of research.
  • We discuss technical issues, limitations and caveats, comparisons against other lists of highly-cited researchers, and potential uses of this resource.
  • [MeSH-major] Biomedical Research / manpower. Research Personnel / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Bibliometrics. Databases, Bibliographic. Humans. Periodicals as Topic / statistics & numerical data. Publications / statistics & numerical data

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  • [Copyright] © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
  • (PMID = 24134636.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2362
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of clinical investigation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Clin. Invest.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Bibliometrics / biomedical researchers / citation counts / h-index / scientific impact / scientometrics
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6. Irvine J, Firestone J, Ong L, Cribbie R, Dorian P, Harris L, Ritvo P, Katz J, Newman D, Cameron D, Johnson S, Bilanovic A, Hill A, O'Donnell S, Sears S Jr: A randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavior therapy tailored to psychological adaptation to an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Psychosom Med; 2011 Apr;73(3):226-33
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  • [Title] A randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavior therapy tailored to psychological adaptation to an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.
  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate a eight-session cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention tailored to adaptation in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients; and to test for treatment group by gender interaction effects.
  • METHODS: Patients receiving their first ICD implant were randomized to CBT or usual cardiac care.
  • Primary outcomes measured at baseline, 6-month, and 12-month follow-ups were symptoms of anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (Impact of Events Scale-Revised), and phobic anxiety (Crown-Crisp Experiential Index).
  • Secondary outcomes were quality of life (Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary and Short Form-36 Mental Component Summary) and ICD shocks or antitachycardia pacing therapies.
  • RESULTS: Of 292 eligible patients, 193 consented and were randomized to CBT (n = 96) or usual cardiac care (n = 97).
  • Eighty percent were male; mean age was 64.4 years (standard deviation = 14.3); and 70% received an ICD for secondary prevention.
  • No baseline differences were observed between the treatment conditions; however, women scored worse than men on all psychological and quality of life variables (p < .05).
  • Eighty-three percent completed follow-up.
  • Repeated-measures analyses of covariance revealed significantly greater improvement with CBT on posttraumatic stress disorder total and avoidance symptoms for men and women combined (p < .05) and significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms and Short Form-36 Mental Component Summary only in women (p < .01).
  • No differences were observed between treatment conditions on ICD therapies over follow-up.
  • CONCLUSION: A CBT intervention to assist adaptation to an ICD enhanced psychological functioning over the first year post implant.
  • [MeSH-major] Adaptation, Psychological. Arrhythmias, Cardiac / therapy. Cognitive Therapy / methods. Defibrillators, Implantable / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Death, Sudden, Cardiac / prevention & control. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Quality of Life. Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic / prevention & control. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 21321256.001).
  • [ISSN] 1534-7796
  • [Journal-full-title] Psychosomatic medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Psychosom Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] ClinicalTrials.gov/ NCT00152763
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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7. Bühler L, Kurilla-Mahon B, Chang Q, Abraham S, Alwayn IP, Appel JZ 3rd, Newman D, Awwad M, White-Scharf ME, Sackstein R, Sachs DH, Cooper DK, Down JD: Cryopreservation and mycophenolate therapy are detrimental to hematopoietic progenitor cells. Transplantation; 2002 Oct 27;74(8):1159-66
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  • [Title] Cryopreservation and mycophenolate therapy are detrimental to hematopoietic progenitor cells.
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to determine whether certain components of nonmyeloablative regimens for hematopoietic cell transplantation might compromise the growth of hematopoietic progenitors.
  • METHODS: Porcine peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) were cytokine-mobilized, collected by leukapheresis, and cryopreserved using 5% dimethyl sulfoxide and 6% hydroxyethyl starch.
  • The influence of cryopreservation on PBPC was tested in vitro by enumeration of colony-forming units (CFUs) in methylcellulose and cobblestone area-forming cell (CAFC) subsets in stromal-associated long-term cultures on fresh and frozen PBPC.
  • The effects of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on porcine PBPC and baboon and human bone marrow (BM) were tested in vitro by adding varying doses of MMF to the CFU assays.
  • One baboon was treated with increasing doses of MMF (100-500 mg/kg per day continuously intravenous), and sequential BM aspirations were tested for CFU content.
  • RESULTS: Fresh cytokine-mobilized PBPC had similar frequencies of progenitor cells when compared with porcine BM.
  • Freezing-thawing of PBPC had no effect on porcine CFUs but reduced the recovery of CAFCs by more than 90%.
  • In vitro, MMF completely inhibited the development of porcine and human CFUs at a concentration of 1 microg/mL and of baboon CFUs at levels between 10 and 100 microg/mL.
  • Plasma-free mycophenolic acid levels of 10 to 30 microg/mL were associated with decreased CFUs in the BM.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cryopreservation and MMF potentially prevent engraftment of porcine PBPC by reducing the content or development of progenitor cells.
  • These results indicate that the use of fresh PBPC might improve the induction of mixed hematopoietic chimerism and raise the possibility that use of high doses of MMF in the poststem cell transplant may compromise engraftment.
  • [MeSH-major] Cryopreservation. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Hematopoietic Stem Cells / drug effects. Immunosuppressive Agents / pharmacology. Mycophenolic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Mycophenolic Acid / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Division / drug effects. Cell Survival / drug effects. Female. Humans. In Vitro Techniques. Leukapheresis. Male. Papio. Swine, Miniature. Transplantation, Heterologous

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  • (PMID = 12438964.001).
  • [ISSN] 0041-1337
  • [Journal-full-title] Transplantation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Transplantation
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 1P01 AI 45897; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 5P01 AI 39755
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 9242ECW6R0 / mycophenolate mofetil; HU9DX48N0T / Mycophenolic Acid
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8. Kao L, Kurtz LM, Shao X, Papadopoulos MC, Liu L, Bok D, Nusinowitz S, Chen B, Stella SL, Andre M, Weinreb J, Luong SS, Piri N, Kwong JM, Newman D, Kurtz I: Severe neurologic impairment in mice with targeted disruption of the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe2 (Slc4a5 gene). J Biol Chem; 2011 Sep 16;286(37):32563-74
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  • [Title] Severe neurologic impairment in mice with targeted disruption of the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe2 (Slc4a5 gene).
  • The choroid plexus lining the four ventricles in the brain is where the majority of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is produced.
  • The secretory function of the choroid plexus is mediated by specific transport systems that allow the directional flux of nutrients and ions into the CSF and the removal of toxins.
  • Normal CSF dynamics and chemistry ensure that the environment for neural function is optimal.
  • Here, we report that targeted disruption of the Slc4a5 gene encoding the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe2 results in significant remodeling of choroid plexus epithelial cells, including abnormal mitochondrial distribution, cytoskeletal protein expression, and ion transporter polarity.
  • These changes are accompanied by very significant abnormalities in intracerebral ventricle volume, intracranial pressure, and CSF electrolyte levels.
  • The Slc4a5(-/-) mice are significantly more resistant to induction of seizure behavior than wild-type controls.
  • In the retina of Slc4a5(-/-) mice, loss of photoreceptors, ganglion cells, and retinal detachment results in visual impairment assessed by abnormal electroretinogram waveforms.
  • Our findings are the first demonstration of the fundamental importance of NBCe2 in the biology of the nervous system.

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  • (PMID = 21705333.001).
  • [ISSN] 1083-351X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of biological chemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Biol. Chem.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / P30 EY000331-45; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK058563; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK077162; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY000331-45; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK077162; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / P30 EY000331; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / R01 EY018644; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY018644-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK058563; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / R01 EY018644-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / NBCe2 protein, mouse; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / Sodium-Bicarbonate Symporters
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3173174
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9. Mishra A, Newman D: An Interesting Case of Life-Threatening Hypercalcemia Secondary to Atypical Parathyroid Adenoma versus Parathyroid Carcinoma. Case Rep Med; 2014;2014:473814
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An Interesting Case of Life-Threatening Hypercalcemia Secondary to Atypical Parathyroid Adenoma versus Parathyroid Carcinoma.
  • Context. Severe hypercalcemia is a life-threatening condition.
  • Atypical parathyroid adenoma and parathyroid carcinomas are uncommon causes which can be difficult to differentiate.
  • Objective. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with very high serum calcium due to a possible atypical parathyroid adenoma versus parathyroid carcinoma.
  • Case Illustration.
  • A serum calcium level of 23.2 mg/dl was noted on admission.
  • He was initially treated with IV hydration, pamidronate, and salmon calcitonin to lower his calcium levels.
  • He also underwent a surgical en bloc resection of parathyroid mass.
  • Pathology showed a mixed picture consistent with possible atypical adenoma versus parathyroid carcinoma.
  • However, due to the possible involvement of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, parathyroid carcinoma was more likely.
  • Also after operation the patient developed hungry bones syndrome and his calcium was replaced vigorously.
  • He continues to be on calcium, vitamin D, and calcitriol supplementation.
  • Results. A review of the literature was conducted to identify previous studies pertaining to parathyroid adenomas and parathyroid cancer.
  • Conclusion. We thereby conclude that hypercalcemia requires very careful monitoring especially after operation.
  • Also it can be very difficult to distinguish between atypical parathyroid adenomas and parathyroid carcinomas as in our case and no clear cut guidelines yet exist to differentiate the two based on histology.

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  • (PMID = 24959180.001).
  • [ISSN] 1687-9627
  • [Journal-full-title] Case reports in medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Case Rep Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4053223
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10. Pushkin A, Abuladze N, Newman D, Lee I, Xu G, Kurtz I: Cloning, characterization and chromosomal assignment of NBC4, a new member of the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter family. Biochim Biophys Acta; 2000 Sep 7;1493(1-2):215-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Cloning, characterization and chromosomal assignment of NBC4, a new member of the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter family.
  • We report the cloning, characterization and chromosomal assignment of a new member of the sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) family, NBC4, from human heart.
  • NBC4 maps to chromosome 2p13 and is a new candidate gene for Alstrom syndrome.
  • NBC4 encodes a 1074-residue polypeptide with 12 putative membrane-spanning domains.
  • Unlike other members of the NBC family, NBC4 has a unique glycine-rich region (amino acids 438-485).
  • In addition, NBC4 lacks the lysine-rich C-terminus of NBC1 with which it is most homologous.
  • The first of two putative stilbene binding motifs (K(M/L)(X)K) is lacking in NBC4 (amino acids 655-658).
  • The approximately 6 kb NBC4 transcript is moderately expressed in heart, with the highest expression in liver, testes and spleen.
  • [MeSH-major] Carrier Proteins / genetics. Membrane Proteins / metabolism. Myocardium / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Bicarbonates / metabolism. Binding Sites. Chromosome Mapping. Cloning, Molecular. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / genetics. Hearing Loss, Sensorineural / genetics. Humans. Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Molecular Sequence Data. Obesity / genetics. Protein Structure, Secondary. Sequence Alignment. Sodium-Bicarbonate Symporters. Syndrome

  • Gene Ontology. gene/protein/disease-specific - Gene Ontology annotations from this paper .
  • SciCrunch. HGNC: Data: Gene Annotation .
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
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  • (PMID = 10978526.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-3002
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochimica et biophysica acta
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochim. Biophys. Acta
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] GENBANK/ AF207661
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK46976
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bicarbonates; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / Sodium-Bicarbonate Symporters
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